Latest Posts

All Posts

Guest Blogger

Recent Posts

Enabling Precision Functional Genomics with the Target Accelerator Plasmid Collection

Posted by Guest Blogger on May 11, 2017 10:30:00 AM

This post was contributed  by Jesse S. Boehm, the Associate Director of the Cancer Program at the Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT.

The notion of cancer precision medicine seems so simple! Take a patient’s tumor sample, use cutting edge genomic technologies to map the mutations that are present, and use prior knowledge (data connecting each genotype with vulnerabilities) to design a therapeutic strategy that works.

But, those darn cancers have revealed many tricks up their sleeves and most patients still don’t benefit from this approach. One central bottleneck is that most recurrently mutated cancer genes are rare and most of the individual variants found in tumors are exceedingly rare. As a result, how most of these “variants of unknown significance” (sometimes called “VUS”) function is unknown. How can we make a decision for each patient if the majority of information on each cancer clinical sequencing report includes rare variants that haven’t been characterized?

Read More >

Topics: Cancer

How to Design Your gRNA for CRISPR Genome Editing

Posted by Guest Blogger on May 3, 2017 11:00:00 AM

This Post was updated on May 3, 2017 with additional information and resources. 

This post was contributed by guest blogger, Addgene Advisory Board member, and Associate Director of the Genetic Perturbation Platform at the Broad Institute, John Doench.

CRISPR technology has made it easier than ever both to engineer specific DNA edits and to perform functional screens to identify genes involved in a phenotype of interest. This blog post will discuss differences between these approaches, as well as provide updates on how best to design gRNAs. You can also find validated gRNAs for your next experiment in Addgene's Validated gRNA Sequence Datatable.

Read More >

Topics: Plasmid How To, Genome Engineering, Lab Tips, CRISPR

Tips for Getting a Faculty Position

Posted by Guest Blogger on May 2, 2017 10:30:00 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger Erik Snapp, Director of Graduate and Postdoctoral Programs at Janelia Research Campus.

Eight years ago, I decided to write a "how to" manual on applying for faculty positions in biomedical science. My motivation was to share my experiences from my own job search and my time on faculty search committees. Having successfully navigated the trials and tribulations of the process, I’ve provided guidance and mentoring to several people that found my insights helpful. All went on to get faculty positions at top state colleges, private universities, and medical schools.

Read More >

Topics: Career

March for Science

Posted by Guest Blogger on Apr 21, 2017 10:30:00 AM


This post was contributed by guest blogger, Stephanie Hays, 
a scientist with a passion for photosynthetic communities, microbial interactions, and science education. 

Disclaimer: The views presented in this article are those of the author do not represent a formal stance taken by Addgene or its staff.

In Washington, D.C. as well as sister locations on April 22, 2017, scientists and non-scientists alike will march to advocate for science’s place in education, government, and civilization in general (1).

Science and Politics?

Science is an apolitical process for seeking knowledge. The process begins with a testable hypothesis - an educated guess about how some part of the world functions. Experiments come next, testing the correctness of the hypothesis. The results of experiments can help support or reject a hypothesis. Looking at the data, scientists then revise their hypotheses and the cycle begins again. No part of this process is inherently political so why is there a march in Washington, D.C., the seat of the United States government?

Read More >

Topics: Career, News, Science Communication

Addgene Depositors Get More Citations

Posted by Guest Blogger on Apr 20, 2017 10:30:00 AM

This post was contributed by guest bloggers Samantha Zyontz and Neil Thompson from the MIT Sloan School of Management.

Professor Feng Zhang’s original 2013 gene editing paper on CRISPR/Cas amassed nearly 2,400 citations in its first four years (1). In addition to publishing in Science, Professor Zhang deposited the associated plasmids with Addgene. Since then, Addgene has filled over 6,500 requests for these plasmids. While clearly an outlier, this story had us wondering: is there a larger trend here? Do papers associated with Addgene deposits accumulate more citations than those without Addgene deposits? Even more interestingly, could we tell if depositing a plasmid with Addgene causes a paper to get cited more?

Read More >

Topics: Blog

Blog Logo Vertical-01.png
Click here to subscribe to the Addgene Blog
 
Subscribe