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Communicating your science with help from ComSciCon

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jul 19, 2018 9:12:15 AM

This guest post was contributed by Nathan Sanders of ComSciCon, the Communicating Science Conference series for graduate students.

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Topics: Science Communication

"Build Your Plasmid" the game - Play to teach

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jul 17, 2018 8:23:11 AM

The challenge: Making courses on genetic manipulation more hands on

While teaching courses about gene therapy and genetic manipulation, I and other professors at the University of Barcelona wanted to develop strategies to make our classes more practical and hands-on. Students in these courses get plenty of theory in their lectures, but it can be difficult to determine how much information they’ve absorbed if they don’t get a chance apply it in an interactive setting.

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Topics: Education

10 Basic tips for mammalian cell culture

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jul 12, 2018 9:09:21 AM

This guest post was contributed by Sana Khan Khilji, a PhD student at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces.

Here are some tips for cell culture that will hopefully help you keep a well organized lab and contamination free environment for successful experiments:

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Topics: Lab Tips

Replacing paper: tips for choosing an electronic lab notebook

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jul 10, 2018 9:08:54 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger, Tea Pavlek, Product Marketing Manager at sciNote.

Today, every lab has its own habits and approaches to record keeping. Top priorities in most cases include IP protection, publications and funding. If any of these three pillars crashes, the lab's success and the careers of its researchers are on the line.

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Topics: Lab Tips, Lab Software, reprodcubility, Open Science

Hassle-free 96-well format epitope tagging using Cas9 ribonucleoprotein

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jun 28, 2018 11:01:10 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger Pooran Dewari, a postdoc in Steve Pollard’s lab at the MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine (CRM), Edinburgh.

Most commercial antibodies do not work in pull-down assays: Epitope tagging provides a solution

Proteins - the workhorses of the cell – never work alone in the cellular milieu. It is, therefore, critical to understand how proteins interact with one another (or with DNA) to perform diverse biochemical tasks in the cell. One of the most popular approaches to study protein interactions is the pull-down assay, wherein a protein of interest can be captured along with its associated partners. Common pull-down assays include immunoprecipitation mass spectrometry (IP/MS) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). In IP/MS, a target protein is first immunoprecipitated - along with its associated protein complexes - from the cell-lysate using antibodies against the target protein. The captured protein complexes are then analysed by mass spectrometry to identify the interacting proteins. Similarly, in ChIP-seq assays, chromatin fragments that are bound by a protein of interest are pulled-down and later coupled to high-throughput sequencing to identify genome-wide binding patterns of the target protein.

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Topics: CRISPR, Techniques

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