Latest Posts

All Posts

Mouse Modeling, Part 2: Breeding and Crossing Mice

Posted by Aliyah Weinstein on Aug 6, 2019 8:55:01 AM

In Part 1 of our mouse modeling blog series, we covered techniques that can be used to introduce genetic modifications into mouse embryos. But once you generate a growing colony of genetically engineered mice, what can you do? In this post, we’ll cover why and how to cross mice to create double knockout lines and Cre-lox lines, and how to properly control for genetically engineered mice in your experiment.

As you’ve learned in Part 1, there are many types of genetically engineered mice: transgenic mice, knockin and knockout mice, and conditional knockin or knockout mice. While these techniques are each useful for introducing one modification into the mouse genome, they are not commonly used to introduce multiple mutations. This is because as more mutations are introduced into a single embryo, the likelihood that a mouse will end up with the intended genotype at every allele decreases.

Read More >

Topics: Genome Editing, Cre-lox

Advanced Uses of Cre-lox and Flp-FRT - A Neuroscientist’s View

Posted by Guest Blogger on Oct 19, 2017 9:54:49 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger Katrin Michel.

Cre-lox is an incredibly popular and powerful site specific recombinase (SSR) system, but it only gives you a single level of control without modification - either Cre is there or it’s not. Cre-mediated possibilities for site specific (and often cell type specific) control of DNA recombination and gene expression can be advanced by the coordinated use of fellow SSR system FLP-FRT. In addition, a variety of means to spatiotemporally control FLP and Cre expression have been developed. Read on to learn more about FLP-FRT, Cre-lox, and how combinations of FLP and Cre enable additional levels of genetic control.

Read More >

Topics: Cre-lox, Plasmids, Neuroscience

Plasmids 101: Knockout/Knock-In Plasmids

Posted by Benoit Giquel on Dec 1, 2016 10:30:00 AM

One of the most powerful strategies to investigate a gene's function is to inactivate, or "knockout", the gene by replacing it or disrupting it with an piece of DNA designed in the lab. Specially constructed plasmids can be used to replace genes in yeast, mice, or Drosophila through homologous recombination. The concept is simple: deliver a template with a modified version of the targeted sequence to the cell which will recombine the template with the endogenous gene. Here, we'll describe the techniques and the plasmids used to inactivate specific genes in mammalian cells. Despite the popularity of CRISPR-based knockout/knock-in systems, these systems remain valuable, especially in cases where CRISPR cannot be used (e.g. there are no suitable PAM sequences nearby or your gene of interest is difficult to target specifically with a gRNA). Be sure to keep these techniques in mind when choosing a knockout strategy!

Read More >

Topics: Plasmids 101, Cre-lox, Plasmids

Plasmids 101: FLEx Vectors

Posted by Michelle Cronin on Apr 28, 2016 10:30:00 AM

In a previous post from our Plasmids 101 series, we learned how the Cre-loxP recombination system can be used to induce site-specific recombination events, and that the orientation of the flanking loxP sites directs the Cre recombinase to invert, translocate, or excise a DNA fragment. The availability of both wild-type and mutant loxP sites has allowed scientists to leverage this system in new, creative ways. Today’s post will focus on one such strategy--the FLEx switch--which utilizes recombination elements to turn off expression of one gene, while simultaneously turning on the expression of another!

Read More >

Topics: Plasmids 101, Cre-lox, Plasmids

Teaching an Old DOG New Tricks: Controlling Protein Activity with GFP

Posted by Mary Gearing on Nov 24, 2015 10:30:00 AM

At Addgene, we love GFP, and we’re always excited when depositors find new ways to make this workhorse protein even more useful! From FPs optimized for oxidizing environments to photoconvertible variants, it seems like GFP is always learning new things. Now, work from Connie Cepko’s lab allow researchers to activate transcription or Cre recombinase activity only in the presence of GFP. These systems, known as T-DDOG and Cre-DOG, respectively, repurpose popular GFP reporter lines for more sophisticated experimental manipulations, saving the time and money needed to develop new lines.

Read More >

Topics: Fluorescent Proteins, Cre-lox, Other Fluorescent Protein Tools

Click here to subscribe to the Addgene Blog
 
Subscribe

 

All Topics

see all

Recent Posts