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Nanoblades: Tiny CRISPR Ninjas for Genome Editing Difficult Cells

Posted by Beth Kenkel on Sep 26, 2019 8:50:00 AM

CRISPR is a simple and versatile tool for genome engineering, but its utility is dependent on its ability to infiltrate cells. Options for CRISPR delivery include plasmid transfection, RNP electroporation, and viral transduction; but these methods aren’t stealthy enough to gain access to some cells and tissues, such as human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Nanoblades, a new CRISPR delivery method developed by the Ricci Lab and the T. Ohlmann Lab, adds a covert tool to the CRISPR tool box. 

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Topics: CRISPR, CRISPR Expression Systems and Delivery Methods

Mobile-CRISPRi: Bringing CRISPRi to Diverse Bacteria

Posted by Beth Kenkel on Apr 4, 2019 8:53:46 AM

The vast majority of bacteria are undomesticated which limits the tools scientists can use to study them. For example, gene knockdown with CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) has been limited to lab-adapted bacteria because it has been challenging to introduce CRISPRi machinery into diverse bacteria species. Existing protocols can transfer CRISPRi into a single bacterial strain, such as a B. subtilis, or a narrow range of bacterial species, such as the human gut bacteria B. thetaiotaomicron, Mycobacterium, Pseudomonas, and E. coli. However, many non-model bacterial species lack genetic tools.

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Topics: CRISPR, CRISPR Expression Systems and Delivery Methods

CRISPR 101: Ribonucleoprotein (RNP) delivery

Posted by Andrew Hempstead on Sep 6, 2018 8:02:59 AM

CRISPR has greatly enhanced the ability of scientists to make genomic alterations, bringing about a revolution in genome engineering, with new techniques rapidly being developed. Performing a CRISPR experiment requires delivery of, at minimum, two components: the Cas9 protein and a guide RNA (gRNA) targeting your genomic site of interest. This is commonly performed by transfecting cells with a plasmid, such as PX459, which encodes Cas9 and contains a site for inserting a custom gRNA.  While this methodology has proven to be incredibly valuable to scientists, there are some potential complications that must be considered when using this method:

  1.     Cells must be amenable to transfection or viral transduction
  2.     Appropriate promoters must be chosen for both Cas9 and gRNA expression  
  3.     Plasmid DNA may be incorporated into the genome
  4.     Off-target effects can occur due to prolonged Cas9 expression
  5.     The requirement for Cas9 transcription and translation delays editing
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Topics: CRISPR, CRISPR 101, CRISPR Expression Systems and Delivery Methods

Generating Mouse Models Using CRISPR/Cas9

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jul 12, 2016 10:30:00 AM

This post was contributed by guest bloggers, Wenning Qin and Haoyi Wang.

CRISPR/Cas9 is revolutionizing the mouse gene-targeting field. Mice have long been extremely useful in the lab – they are relatively small and easy to work with, making them the go-to choice for studying mammalian biology. Similar to any model, mice are not without their problems, but much genetic and physiological data have been accumulated over the years using them. Indeed, the future of mouse work is bright as it is now easier than ever to manipulate the mouse genome using CRISPR/Cas9.

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Topics: CRISPR, CRISPR Expression Systems and Delivery Methods

Tips for CRISPR Gene Editing in Mice

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jun 28, 2016 6:59:27 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger Samantha Young.

The use of CRISPR/Cas9 for gene editing has expanded since its adaptation for use in mammalian cells in 2012-2013. Researchers are now using this system in ever more creative ways, (Wang et al., 2013, Cho et al., 2014). There are several variants of the CRISPR/Cas9 system floating around, and many pre-designed plasmids containing these variants ready for purchase. But what is the easiest and fastest way to use the system in mice? We'll have a post that goes into the mouse genome editing process in a bit more detail in the coming weeks, but, in this post, we will outline a simple method for selecting the guide RNA, validating its efficacy in vitro, and using it in mouse embryos to generate gene modified mouse lines. Hopefully this post will help get your in vivo research up and running as soon as possible!

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Topics: CRISPR, CRISPR Expression Systems and Delivery Methods

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