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A Guide to Designing a Scientific Poster: Content, Layout, and More

Posted by Michael G. Lemieux on Oct 22, 2019 8:20:00 AM

You’ve done great research and made interesting discoveries. You’ve analyzed the data and generated beautiful figures. And, you can’t wait to tell your story. But, before you can show off your work at a conference, you need to first make your poster. While a poster generally contains the same sections as a primary research article, it’s important to understand that presenting your work in poster format differs in many ways from writing a manuscript.

If you have ever attended a scientific conference, or even a lab recruiting session at your university, you are likely aware of how different posters can be. You have also probably thought about why certain posters resonate with you (or not). It is important to reflect on these impressions when thinking about crafting your own poster.

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Topics: Science Careers, Conferences

The Scientific Conference Poster Session: Tips for Success

Posted by Guest Blogger on Aug 29, 2019 8:50:04 AM

This post was contributed by Brittany L. Uhlorn, a PhD Candidate at the University of Arizona.

Perhaps you’re about to present your first scientific poster, but unsure how best to prepare. Maybe you’re a presentation veteran, but have difficulty answering questions. Or perhaps you’re simply attending, but uncertain how to capitalize on your experience. No matter the reason for attending, your preparation and day-of game plan will ensure you have the most beneficial scientific conference experience possible.

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Topics: Science Careers, Conferences

Tips to Make the Most of a Scientific Conference

Posted by Jennifer Tsang on May 23, 2019 8:26:09 AM

So you’ve done the research, gathered up your data into an exciting story, and are ready to present your findings at a conference. But what you get out of a conference depends on what you put into it before, during, and after the meeting. Let’s break it down into the following: the elevator pitch, talks, the poster session, networking, and social media.

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Topics: Science Careers, Conferences

How-to: 5 Steps to a Great Panel Discussion

Posted by Joanne Kamens on Oct 22, 2014 9:57:29 AM

This post was originally published on LinkedIn. Follow Addgene on LinkedIn for repository news and updates.

Panel discussions are becoming a ubiquitous format for events and sessions in scientific conferences. They can result in lively discussions with both panelists and audience fully engaged. They can also be dull and painful to sit through (imagine the entire audience playing Candy Crush or reading email). My advice is always "don't do it unless you can do it well" – even the smallest program. I don't mean have fancy food or a fantastic view (these are nice if you can afford them). I am talking about making sure the audience is interested, educated and talking as a result of the content. Here are some of my tips to organizing and running a memorable panel discussion.

Check out Joanne's Reddit AMA

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Topics: Science Careers, Conferences

A Conference By Postdocs For Postdocs: Future of Research

Posted by Joanne Kamens on Sep 2, 2014 11:05:00 AM

This post was originally published on LinkedIn. Follow Addgene on LinkedIn for repository news and updates.

Scientists must do science to be happy. What do we have to change to ensure that all scientists can have successful careers doing science in some form? There is a lot of talk about the state of scientist training in the US and around the world. There are rumors that we are training too many scientists and some propose radical changes to the way we view the graduate school and postdoc training years.

There is no doubt that there are too many scientists in the pipeline were they all to pursue jobs in academia. Certainly funding for academic research and training is getting tighter and competition is fierce. However, I believe there are plenty of great jobs out there for science PhDs. The problem is that too few of these trainees are sufficiently prepared during their 6-12+ (!) years of training to get jobs. They are not exposed to the vast non-academia career landscape and there is insufficient (or no) emphasis on developing transferable skills to enable pursuit of these diverse opportunities after training.

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Topics: Science Careers, Conferences, Early Career Researcher

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