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Early Career Researcher Toolbox: Finding Relevant Papers

Posted by Beth Kenkel on Jan 9, 2020 8:45:00 AM

Finding research papers is not particularly hard. There are millions of them. The real challenge is finding relevant papers. The latest installment of the Early Career Researcher Toolbox will highlight four tools for finding journal articles related to your actual interests while also staying on top of the ever expanding body of biomedical literature!

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Topics: Science Careers, Early Career Researcher, Scientific Publishing

What Good Citizenship Can Do for Reproducibility in Science

Posted by Guest Blogger on Nov 7, 2019 9:18:13 AM

This post was contributed by Deborah Sweet, Vice President of Editorial at Cell Press.

Almost everyone who works in a lab struggles with reproducibility at some point.

Usually it comes up when a researcher decides on a new project and begins by trying to reproduce someone else’s result. Then, they hit trouble. The experiment won’t work. Even if it does, they don’t get the same result. So, then they end up investing time that they thought would be moving forward instead trying just to get going. It’s like being stuck in jail in Monopoly—you keep rolling the dice and not moving while all your friends are racing around the board. Eventually, you get lucky and manage to escape, but you’ve lost a lot of time.

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Topics: Scientific Sharing, Reproducibility, Scientific Publishing

Scientific Peer-review: Providing Critical and Kind Feedback and Advocating for Open Science

Posted by Guest Blogger on Aug 8, 2019 9:19:49 AM

This post was contributed by Magdalena Julkowska, a postdoctoral researcher at KAUST, Saudi Arabia.

From the perspective of an author submitting a paper, the peer-review seems like another dragon to slay on the way to publish your work in a scientific journal. The peer-review is a service that we, as scientists, provide for journal editors to help decide whether work is suitable for publication in their journal. The early peer-review attempts took place at the beginning of the 18th century. Yet the peer-review was not widely adopted by the scientific community until the mid-20th century, and many iconic papers, including the ones on the structure of the DNA, were not peer-reviewed (Baldwin, 2015).

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Topics: Scientific Sharing, Open Science, Scientific Publishing

ReFigure: Save Scientific Figures into Dashboards and Share Your Insights

Posted by Guest Blogger on Dec 13, 2017 10:20:23 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger Girija Goyal, cofounder of ReFigure.

Reading and exploration including replications and experiments resulting in “negative data” often dominate the early years of a project. Dissemination of the knowledge gained during this period occurs infrequently and rarely makes it into the small selection of data found in full-length publications. As early career researchers, we wondered how we could make the insights gained during this time more visible and thereby have a positive impact on science.

ReFigure saves time, knowledge and makes your insights discoverable. Watch this quick video to learn how ReFigure works and continue reading for more details.

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Topics: Scientific Sharing, Scientific Publishing

How to Write a Scientific Review Article

Posted by Leila Haery on Feb 16, 2017 10:30:00 AM

Writing a review article is a wonderful way to develop and exercise your scientist skill set. If you dread the thought of writing a review, or if you’re currently stuck trying to write one, hopefully this post will help you get things moving - remember you're becoming an expert in your field and are the perfect person to be writing the review! Doing so is a great way to develop your ability to write, to read efficiently, to search the literature, and to synthesize a large volume of information: basically, a scientist’s tool kit.

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Topics: Scientific Sharing, Scientific Publishing

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