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Behind-the-scenes of the Isolation of the Thermostable IgnaviCas9 From a Yellowstone Hot Spring

Posted by Christina Mork on Nov 12, 2019 9:00:00 AM

In 2008 the Quake Lab at Stanford University became interested in exploring biological dark matter – large tracts of the microbial tree of life that remained unexplored. Using new single-cell sequencing approaches, the lab was able to eliminate the need for axenic (pure) laboratory cultures to study these microbes. From 16S rRNA sequencing, hot springs were known to be diversity hotspots containing abundant biological dark matter and so the lab organized a sampling trip to Yellowstone National Park (YNP).

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Topics: CRISPR, Cas Proteins

Choosing a CRISPR Nuclease: Site Accessibility, Specificity, and Sensitivity

Posted by Andrew Hempstead on Nov 5, 2019 8:28:59 AM

In January 2016 we first published a blog post titled: Which Cas9 Do I Choose for My CRISPR Experiment? The three years flew by, but since then, scientists have adapted CRISPR nucleases for many more specific research needs. In this update, we will focus on the most recent advances and how some of these variants may be appropriate for your specific research question.

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Topics: CRISPR, Cas Proteins

Prime Editing: Adding Precision and Flexibility to CRISPR Editing

Posted by Jennifer Tsang on Oct 24, 2019 9:26:53 AM

There are over 75,000 pathogenic genetic variants that have been identified in humans and catalogued in the ClinVar database. Previously developed genome editing methods using nucleases and base editors have the potential to correct only a minority of those variants in most cell types. A new technique from David Liu’s lab at the Broad Institute could add more precision and flexibility to the CRISPR editing world.

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Topics: CRISPR, Cas Proteins, CRISPR gRNAs, Base Editing

Nanoblades: Tiny CRISPR Ninjas for Genome Editing Difficult Cells

Posted by Beth Kenkel on Sep 26, 2019 8:50:00 AM

CRISPR is a simple and versatile tool for genome engineering, but its utility is dependent on its ability to infiltrate cells. Options for CRISPR delivery include plasmid transfection, RNP electroporation, and viral transduction; but these methods aren’t stealthy enough to gain access to some cells and tissues, such as human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Nanoblades, a new CRISPR delivery method developed by the Ricci Lab and the T. Ohlmann Lab, adds a covert tool to the CRISPR tool box. 

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Topics: CRISPR, CRISPR Expression Systems and Delivery Methods

What's New in CRISPR - September 2019

Posted by Jennifer Tsang on Sep 10, 2019 8:56:17 AM

In this quarterly blog series, we’ll highlight a few of the new CRISPR plasmids available at Addgene. We will still periodically focus on specific CRISPR plasmid tools more in-depth, but we hope that this blog series will help you find new CRISPR tools for your research!

This time:

  • GeneWeld vectors to create knock-ins
  • CasX
  • Drug inducible CRISPR/Cas9 activation
  • Ecoli genome-wide inhibition library
  • CRISPR knockout libraries for cancer research
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Topics: CRISPR, Other CRISPR Tools

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