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Developing a cold tolerant E. coli using specialized chaperones

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jan 28, 2020 9:35:41 AM

This post was contributed by Sreepadmanabh M, a member of the iGEM team from IISER Bhopal.

Following up its 2018 iGEM debut - centered around a prototypical methane biosensor - IISER Bhopal is back in the SynBio arena this year with a fresh team of twenty excited undergrads. Team IISER-B’s idea for the iGEM 2019 is to take bacteria out of their optimally suited temperature ranges and make them grow better at suboptimal ones, which could allow even your regular E. coli to thrive in the bitter cold. 

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Topics: Synthetic Biology, Other

It’s Bioelectric! An Exciting Interdisciplinary Field of Research

Posted by Angela Abitua on Oct 29, 2019 10:52:55 AM

Flash quiz! What pops into your head when you hear the phrase “action potential?” Firing neurons are likely the first thing that comes to mind. However, ion-based communication is not just for neurons. Non-neuronal cells do this too. It's just that for non-neural cells, ion-based communication happens at a slightly slower scale. 

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Topics: Other, Miscellaneous

Advancing Biology with Zebrafish: Genetic Tools for Developmental Studies and More

Posted by Guest Blogger on Aug 13, 2019 8:58:54 AM

This post was contributed by Katherine Rogers, a postdoctoral researcher at the Friedrich Miescher Lab of the Max Planck Society.

Zebrafish (Danio rerio) have been used since the 1930’s in a range of biological studies, including investigations into environmental pollutants and health, embryo growth, brain function, and disease development. Why have zebrafish become such a popular model organism?

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Topics: Other, Organisms

Mouse Modeling, Part 2: Breeding and Crossing Mice

Posted by Aliyah Weinstein on Aug 6, 2019 8:55:01 AM

In Part 1 of our mouse modeling blog series, we covered techniques that can be used to introduce genetic modifications into mouse embryos. But once you generate a growing colony of genetically engineered mice, what can you do? In this post, we’ll cover why and how to cross mice to create double knockout lines and Cre-lox lines, and how to properly control for genetically engineered mice in your experiment.

As you’ve learned in Part 1, there are many types of genetically engineered mice: transgenic mice, knockin and knockout mice, and conditional knockin or knockout mice. While these techniques are each useful for introducing one modification into the mouse genome, they are not commonly used to introduce multiple mutations. This is because as more mutations are introduced into a single embryo, the likelihood that a mouse will end up with the intended genotype at every allele decreases.

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Topics: Cre-lox, Other, Organisms

Save Time with Transient Plant Leaf Transformations

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jul 25, 2019 8:03:52 AM

This post was contributed by Samuel Mortensen, a PhD candidate at Northeastern University.

Working with plants doesn’t always have to be a time-consuming process. While developing transgenic hairy root lines in tissue cultures takes half a year, and generating a transgenic plant can take even longer, a transient plant leaf transformation process could save the plant biologist some time… months, in fact.

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Topics: Plant Biology, Molecular Biology Protocols and Tips, Other

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