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HA Frankenbody, a New Imaging Tool to Visualize Single Molecules and Nascent Peptides

Posted by Alyssa Cecchetelli on Oct 10, 2019 8:41:58 AM

Part stable scaffold, part epitope binding region, all fused to a fluorescent protein. “Frankenbody,” like the infamous frankenstein, was constructed by grafting different parts together. By combining two optimized elements of an antibody probe, scientists can now more easily visualize single molecules and newly formed proteins. 

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Topics: Fluorescent Proteins, Localization with Fluorescent Proteins

Fluorescent Proteins 101: Monitoring Cell Mobility Using Fluorescent Proteins

Posted by Benoit Giquel on Aug 15, 2017 9:24:39 AM

In complex metazoans, rapid cell division and large scale cell mobility are essential processes during embryonic development. These are required for a growing organism to make the complicated transition from a clump of cells to a fully differentiated body. In contrast, these dynamic processes are largely absent in adult organisms, where tissues structures are more stable and local movements predominate (e.g. a basal progenitor cell migrating to the epithelium). At this stage, only cells from the immune system show wide scale mobility with movement from the bone marrow and other lymphoid organs to specific tissues where they can scan for any signs of danger. In this post we’ll focus on how fluorescent proteins can and have been used to monitor cellular movements in the immune system. The techniques used here could be adapted to studying other systems in which there is large scale cellular movement throughout an organism.

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Topics: Fluorescent Proteins, Fluorescent Proteins 101, Localization with Fluorescent Proteins

Visualizing Translation at the Single Molecule Level

Posted by Mary Gearing on Aug 1, 2017 9:15:16 AM

Regulating translation is key to cellular function, especially during development or stress. With ribosome profiling, researchers have been able to study the effects of various stimuli on global translation, but a visual technique to study translation remained elusive. Two techniques developed by Addgene depositors have made it easier to track translation in two different ways: by monitoring the first round of translation or by tracking the translation of a single mRNA over time. Both are helping researchers explore the complexity of translational control in cellular physiology.

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Topics: Fluorescent Proteins, Localization with Fluorescent Proteins

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