Latest Posts

All Posts

Human Germline Editing Using CRISPR

Posted by Mary Gearing on Aug 10, 2017 10:19:54 AM

Note: After this blog was published, a bioRxiv preprint that questions the conclusion of inter-homologue recombination was released. This blog has not been updated in response to this paper.

Any hint of CRISPR editing in human embryos has been met with a storm of media coverage. But the paper published August 2nd in Nature gives us even more to talk about, as it represents another step towards CRISPR germline editing of disease-causing mutations. But how close are we really, and what new questions does this paper bring up? We’ll sift through the paper to understand what Shoukhrat Mitalipov and his colleagues have achieved, and how the field will move forward from this work.

Read More >

Topics: CRISPR, CRISPR Therapeutic Applications

Targeting HIV-1 with CRISPR: Shock and Kill or Cut it Out?

Posted by Mary Gearing on May 10, 2016 10:30:00 AM


Over 25 million people worldwide are currently infected with the
lentivirus HIV-1. Today, HIV-1 can be controlled with antiviral therapies such that the virus is undetectable in the blood. But the virus doesn’t completely disappear; it just hides in latently infected cells. To truly cure HIV-1, researchers need to vanquish these hidden viral reservoirs, and CRISPR may be the way to accomplish this tough job! Kamel Khalili’s lab at Temple University has demonstrated two potential strategies for CRISPR-HIV therapeutics - one using dCas9-SAM to activate HIV-1 transcription and destroy infected cells, the other using wild-type Cas9 to remove the HIV-1 genome from infected cells. Read on to learn how CRISPR can take on HIV-1 in vitro, and what obstacles must be overcome for clinical success.

Read More >

Topics: CRISPR, CRISPR Therapeutic Applications

CRISPR Antimicrobials

Posted by Mary Gearing on May 3, 2016 10:30:00 AM

The crisis of antibiotic resistance is upon us, and the world is unprepared. Each year in the United States, two million people will be infected by antibiotic resistant bacteria. Even when researchers develop new antibiotics, the onset of resistance is swift, as few as five years after introduction. Current antibiotic strategies are nonspecific - they harm any bacterial cell without a resistance gene, allowing resistant bacteria to multiply, spreading their resistance genes throughout the bacterial population. But what if we could specifically target only virulent or antibiotic resistant bacteria with a weapon that they’ll have less potential to become resistant to? CRISPR may provide a method for doing just that. While challenges remain in the delivery of these agents, CRISPR antimicrobials could become our newest line of defense against bacteria.

Read More >

Topics: CRISPR, CRISPR Therapeutic Applications

Using CRISPR/Cas9 to Edit Disease Out of the Genome

Posted by Kendall Morgan on Jan 7, 2014 10:45:00 AM

There can be no doubt that CRISPR/Cas9 technology has been a breakthrough for the genome-editing field. Now two studies reported in Cell Stem Cell last month show that this tool - already so useful in the laboratory - might also find its way to the clinic.

A team led by Jinsong Li from the Chinese Academy of Sciences found that mice with a dominant mutation in a gene that causes cataracts could be rescued by coinjection into zygotes of Cas9 mRNA and a single-guide RNA targeting the mutant allele. An independent team led by Hans Clevers at Hubrecht Institute in The Netherlands used the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system to correct the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductor receptor (CFTR) by homologous recombination in cultured intestinal stem cells of patients with cystic fibrosis.

Read More >

Topics: CRISPR, CRISPR Therapeutic Applications

Click here to subscribe to the Addgene Blog
 
Subscribe

 

All Topics

see all

Recent Posts