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Starter guide to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) part 1:  A renaissance in regenerative medicine

Posted by Guest Blogger on Oct 30, 2018 9:04:26 AM

This post was contributed by Kusumika (Kushi) Mukherjee, editor of Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, a Cell Press reviews journal.

Stem cells are special types of cells that can develop or “differentiate” into more specialized cells with specific functions [1]. In many tissues, stem cells serve to replenish/replace damaged cells that no longer function adequately [1]. Stem cells’ ability to differentiate into multiple cell types makes them useful models for developmental processes and promising therapeutic tools. The two unique characteristics that define stem cells are:

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Topics: Stem Cells

Delivery Methods for Generating iPSCs

Posted by Beth Kenkel on Apr 17, 2018 9:37:57 AM

The field of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) has been around for 10 years. In that time, scientists have used almost all available approaches for generating iPSCs. The generation of iPSCs is relatively simple in concept: ectopically express a cocktail of stem cell reprogramming factors and wait for cells to de-differentiate. However it’s difficult, especially as a newbie reprogrammer, to decide which method to use. This post provides a brief overview of reprogramming methods with the goal of helping readers choose a strategy suited to their research.

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Topics: Stem Cells

pCXLE toolkit: Efficient episomal plasmid-based method to reprogram peripheral blood cells to iPSCs

Posted by Guest Blogger on Dec 14, 2017 9:08:09 AM

This post was contributed by Kusumika (Kushi) Mukherjee, a Postdoc at Massachussetts General Hospital.

A little over a decade back when Yamanaka and colleagues reported that it is possible to reprogram differentiated cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by the addition of reprogramming (or “Yamanaka”) factors, they changed the landscape of regenerative medicine. Their work opened up vast possibilities for the clinical and therapeutic applications of iPSCs. The generation of human iPSCs (hiPSCs) now provides an opportunity to develop and use patient-specific somatic cells that are otherwise difficult to obtain. These can then be used to perform cell therapy and to model diseases in vitro.

Find stem cell plasmids at Addgene

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Topics: Stem Cells, Hot Plasmids, Plasmid Technology

Stem Cell Models for Disease & Open Science: Interview with Darrell Kotton

Posted by Tyler Ford on Jul 7, 2017 9:32:42 AM

Darrell Kotton is the director of the Center for Regenerative Medicine at Boston University Medical School. Darrell’s research focuses on the lungs, and, among other projects, using stem cells to develop in vitro models for lung disease. Darrell strives to promote open source biology in his own lab, at the Center for Regenerative Medicine, and within the biomedical research community. Along these lines, Darrell recently joined the Addgene Board of Directors where he hopes to help keep us focused on our core mission to promote scientific sharing. Listen to learn more about Darrell, his research, and his focus on open science.

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Topics: Stem Cells, Podcast

Four Factors that Differentiate the Stem Cell Field

Posted by Eric J. Perkins on Sep 28, 2016 10:35:00 AM

When our Director of Biology, Lianna Swanson, suggested that I might be able to attend the 10 Years of iPSCs Symposium earlier this year, I jumped at the chance. Here was an opportunity to see Shinya Yamanaka celebrate the tenth anniversary of his landmark Cell paper showing that it was possible to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) capable of forming nearly all cell types in the body from otherwise terminally differentiated cells simply by expressing four proteins Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and cMyc (the so called OSKM factors). As the Yamanaka lab's primary Addgene contact for many years, I've been looking forward to seeing how the sharing of his OSKM factors have affected the stem cell community – a community largely created due to Yamanaka’s seminal work.

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Topics: Stem Cells

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