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Engaging with science and society at pgEd

Posted by Guest Blogger on Sep 20, 2018 8:17:37 AM

This guest post was contributed by Johnny Kung, Director of New Initiatives for the Personal Genetics Education Project (pgEd).

Advances in genetic technologies and other biomedical innovations promise an improved understanding of how our bodies work, new treatments for debilitating diseases, and maybe even ways to alleviate health disparities. But as the science moves forward at a blistering pace, it is becoming ever more urgent for scientists to engage broadly with diverse communities, to raise awareness about where science is and where it is going, and to thoughtfully address the hopes and concerns of these communities. This kind of engagement and two-way dialogue is crucial if we as a society are to figure out the best way to shepherd technologies through thorny ethical issues, ensure that everyone will have the possibility of benefiting from the fruits of scientific research, and prevent technological advances from exacerbating existing inequalities and injustices.

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Topics: Career, Science Communication

Microbes: Look, Listen, and Tell

Posted by Susanna Bachle on Aug 28, 2018 8:04:13 AM

When you think about going to a scientific conference, you may think about sitting amongst a sea of chairs listening to talks all day. But nope, not at the American Society for Microbiology 2018 Microbe meeting. Soon after I arrived, I was looking through a paper-based, affordable, and portable microscope called the ‘foldscope’ (Dr. Prakash, Stanford University). Right there on the floor outside the lecture hall.

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Topics: Microbiology, Science Communication

Communicating your science with help from ComSciCon

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jul 19, 2018 9:12:15 AM

This guest post was contributed by Nathan Sanders of ComSciCon, the Communicating Science Conference series for graduate students.

I believe that communication is the single most important skill that scientists need to succeed in their work. While it's not always recognized and valued for its immense importance, it may well be what determines whether you get the job after your next interview or whether your receive the next grant you apply for.

After all, the only value your work will have in the world is the value that you can succeed in communicating. Even the most rigorous, insightful, and novel scientific research will be wasted if you cannot convince others that it is important and relevant to them.  

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Topics: Science Communication

Oh, The Places You Can Go: Careers in Science Communication - Writing for a Research Institute

Posted by Beth Kenkel on Feb 2, 2018 10:20:48 AM

In this post of the Careers in Science Communication blog series, you’ll hear from Susan Keown, a staff writer at the non-profit Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

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Topics: SciComm Careers, Career, Science Communication

The Strength of Story Telling

Posted by Guest Blogger on Dec 19, 2017 9:00:17 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger Jack Leeming Editor of Naturejobs, part of Nature magazine.

Humans are built to enjoy, remember, and listen to narratives — take advantage of that in your work

The part of my job I most enjoy is building and telling interesting stories — whether I’m working with a talented journalist to shine light on living as a scientist in Beijing, talking to people about taking beautiful photographs of their studies, reporting on amazing women in science, or asking someone how and why they left academia. Humans are designed to pay attention and enjoy anecdotal forms of information — identifying with a character, building emotional investment and following cause-and-effect relationships are all things almost all of us are programmed to appreciate and understand.

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Topics: Science Communication

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