Latest Posts

All Posts

Tips for arabidopsis transformation

Posted by Guest Blogger on Oct 25, 2018 9:23:48 AM

This post was contributed by Laura Lee, a graduate student at Stanford University.

Arabidopsis is a fantastic model organism for many reasons, not the least of which is ease of transformation. There are many motivations to generate transgenic Arabidopsis, from studying transcriptional and translational dynamics of genes and proteins in living plants, to complementing mutant phenotypes. Arabidopsis is amenable to the floral drip or dip transformation method. The general steps for this method include:

  • Cloning and transforming a plasmid into the bacterium Agrobacterium tumeficans - a plant pathogenic species that stably integrates transfer DNA (tDNA) into the genomes of the plants it attacks
  • Growing the transformed agrobacterium culture
  • Dipping your plant’s flowers in the agrobacterium culture to allow for tDNA insertions into the plant’s germline
  • Selecting for seeds that have the tDNA insertions (usually via seed growth on antibiotic-containing media)
Read More >

Topics: Plant Biology, Techniques

Tips for a 1st time AAV user (by a Rookie AAV user)

Posted by Beth Kenkel on Oct 23, 2018 7:49:25 AM

My lab's vector of choice is AAV, with nearly every experiment requiring AAV. Before joining my lab, I had never worked with AAV, so naturally I had to package some virus for my first experiment. It was a bit intimidating, but I had my lab’s protocols and some great co-workers to help me out. Even with these tools, I found myself writing AAV production tricks into the margins of my protocol. While these tips weren’t critical to the experiment, they definitely made my life easier!  In this post, I’ll share some AAV production, purification, and titration tips, while also summarizing the basic steps and analyses needed for packaging AAV.

Read More >

Topics: Viral Vectors, Techniques

Overcoming the challenges of lentiviral production

Posted by Meghan Rego on Aug 7, 2018 8:31:12 AM

While lentiviral vectors are popular gene delivery tools, producing lentivirus, can pose certain challenges. Whether choosing a system that is the best fit for the experiment, trying to produce virus of a usable titer, or fine-tuning selection and expression in your target cell line, researchers often find themselves faced with a roadblock. In this post, we will provide an overview of some of the common challenges associated with producing and using lentivirus and offer some tips and tricks for overcoming these hurdles.

Read More >

Topics: Viral Vectors, Techniques, Lab Tips

Hassle-free 96-well format epitope tagging using Cas9 ribonucleoprotein

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jun 28, 2018 11:01:10 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger Pooran Dewari, a postdoc in Steve Pollard’s lab at the MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine (CRM), Edinburgh.

Most commercial antibodies do not work in pull-down assays: Epitope tagging provides a solution

Proteins - the workhorses of the cell – never work alone in the cellular milieu. It is, therefore, critical to understand how proteins interact with one another (or with DNA) to perform diverse biochemical tasks in the cell. One of the most popular approaches to study protein interactions is the pull-down assay, wherein a protein of interest can be captured along with its associated partners. Common pull-down assays include immunoprecipitation mass spectrometry (IP/MS) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). In IP/MS, a target protein is first immunoprecipitated - along with its associated protein complexes - from the cell-lysate using antibodies against the target protein. The captured protein complexes are then analysed by mass spectrometry to identify the interacting proteins. Similarly, in ChIP-seq assays, chromatin fragments that are bound by a protein of interest are pulled-down and later coupled to high-throughput sequencing to identify genome-wide binding patterns of the target protein.

Read More >

Topics: CRISPR, Techniques

dTAG - You're it!

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jun 21, 2018 10:06:52 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger Behnam Nabet, a postdoctoral fellow at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.

Targeted Protein Degradation

In the Bradner and Gray labs, we synthesize compounds that enable selective removal of proteins-of-interest from the proteome. Rather than inhibiting protein function, these so-called “small molecule degraders” recruit the proteasome to destroy targeted proteins. We previously developed small molecule degraders that achieve selective degradation of endogenous proteins (notably, BRD2/3/4, CDK9, TRIM24, FLT3, BTK, and ALK) by linking small molecules that bind these target proteins to other small molecules that bind an E3 ligase. These bifunctional degraders co-opt E3 ligases such as cereblon (CRBN) or von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) to bring the endogenous degradation machinery into close proximity with the target protein, leading to polyubiquitination of the target protein and proteasomal degradation. Remarkably, small molecule degraders provide distinct advantages over pharmacological inhibitors including rapidly depleting a protein-of-interest, increasing target selectivity, overcoming resistance to inhibitors, and inducing prolonged biological effects.

Read More >

Topics: Techniques, Hot Plasmids

Click here to subscribe to the Addgene Blog
 
Subscribe

 

Recent Posts