Latest Posts

All Posts

Fluorescent Protein Travel Awards - Protein Variants, a Serotonin Sensor, and an Artificial Leaf Replica System

Posted by Jennifer Tsang on Jun 4, 2019 9:02:29 AM

Fluorescent proteins have enabled scientists to pursue creative research avenues previously unavailable to them. With these tools it’s now easy to monitor protein expression, localization, and protein-protein interactions. Beyond these common applications, researchers are finding new ways to apply fluorescent proteins everyday. 

Read More >

Topics: Fluorescent Proteins

FlipGFP, a novel fluorescence protease reporter to study apoptosis

Posted by Alyssa Cecchetelli on May 21, 2019 8:10:19 AM

Apoptosis or “programmed cell death" plays a pivotal role in an array of biological processes including development, the immune system, and cell turnover. Apoptosis is a highly controlled process that is triggered by internal and external signals such as developmental cues and DNA damage. These signals activate a cascade of caspases, protease enzymes that cleave proteins. Executioner caspases are activated last in the cascade and are responsible for the degradation of over 600 cellular components ultimately leading to cell fragmentation and death (Elmore, 2007).

Read More >

Topics: Fluorescent Proteins

Bright Monomeric Fluorescent Proteins: mNeonGreen, mTFP1, and mWasabi

Posted by Jennifer Tsang on Apr 25, 2019 11:01:12 AM

We are excited about our new partnership with Allele Biotechnology which allows researchers to deposit plasmids containing the fluorescent protein mNeonGreen. This fluorescent protein joins mTFP1 and mWasabi, as fluorophores from Allele Biotechnology that now can be deposited at Addgene. What makes these fluorescent proteins unique and what can they be used for? Let’s take a look!

Read More >

Topics: Fluorescent Proteins

GFP Fusion Proteins - Making the Right Connection

Posted by Guest Blogger on Apr 9, 2019 9:13:55 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger Joachim Goedart, an assistant professor at the Section of Molecular Cytology and van Leeuwenhoek Centre for Advanced Microscopy (University of Amsterdam).

Tagging a protein of interest with a fluorescent protein to study its function is one of the most popular applications of fluorescent proteins. These fusion proteins enable the observation of proteins in living cells and organisms. Both components of the chimera are encoded by DNA. Since researchers can generate almost any DNA sequence in the way that they like, the design and engineering of fusion proteins is relatively straightforward. However, generating a fusion while keeping all of the native properties of the protein of interest can be challenging. In this blog I discuss strategies to generate fusion proteins and highlight some aspects of their design. 

Read More >

Topics: Fluorescent Proteins

Multicolor Animals: Using Fluorescent Proteins to Understand Single Cell Behavior

Posted by Aliyah Weinstein on Mar 5, 2019 8:08:52 AM

Stochastic multicolor labeling is a popular technique in neuroscience and developmental biology. This type of cell labeling technique involves the introduction of a transgene construct containing fluorescent proteins (XFP) of different colors to label an organ or entire organism. Because each cell can have multiple copies of the transgene that will recombine independently, cells may acquire one of a variety of colors when a combination of XFP are expressed. Each cell remains the same color for its entire lifetime and daughter cells retain the same color, allowing for the fate mapping of cell populations over time. The ability to track single cell dynamics at the organism level has been made possible by tools that allow cells to become persistently fluorescent during development. Stochastic multicolor labeling systems, many based on Brainbow, now exist for a variety of species, cell types, and research applications.

Read More >

Topics: Fluorescent Proteins

Click here to subscribe to the Addgene Blog
 
Subscribe

 

Recent Posts