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The Scientific Conference Poster Session: Tips for Success

Posted by Guest Blogger on Aug 29, 2019 8:50:04 AM

This post was contributed by Brittany L. Uhlorn, a PhD Candidate at the University of Arizona.

Perhaps you’re about to present your first scientific poster, but unsure how best to prepare. Maybe you’re a presentation veteran, but have difficulty answering questions. Or perhaps you’re simply attending, but uncertain how to capitalize on your experience. No matter the reason for attending, your preparation and day-of game plan will ensure you have the most beneficial scientific conference experience possible.

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Topics: Science Careers, Conferences

Harnessing Bacterial Toxins for Allelic Exchange

Posted by Guest Blogger on Aug 15, 2019 8:30:02 AM

This post was contributed by Jacob Lazarus, a postdoctoral researcher at Harvard.

There’s an astounding number of ways to create chromosomal mutations in bacteria, so many that it may be difficult to decide which path to take. A quick and easy way to introduce a mutation in the chromosome is to disrupt expression of a gene with an antibiotic resistance cassette. This leaves a “scar” in the chromosome, sometimes interfering with expression of surrounding genes. However, there are ways to create scarless mutations, ones that don’t leave any undesired scars in the chromosome.

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Topics: Genome Editing, Plasmids

Advancing Biology with Zebrafish: Genetic Tools for Developmental Studies and More

Posted by Guest Blogger on Aug 13, 2019 8:58:54 AM

This post was contributed by Katherine Rogers, a postdoctoral researcher at the Friedrich Miescher Lab of the Max Planck Society.

Zebrafish (Danio rerio) have been used since the 1930’s in a range of biological studies, including investigations into environmental pollutants and health, embryo growth, brain function, and disease development. Why have zebrafish become such a popular model organism?

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Topics: Genome Editing

Scientific Peer-review: Providing Critical and Kind Feedback and Advocating for Open Science

Posted by Guest Blogger on Aug 8, 2019 9:19:49 AM

This post was contributed by Magdalena Julkowska, a postdoctoral researcher at KAUST, Saudi Arabia.

From the perspective of an author submitting a paper, the peer-review seems like another dragon to slay on the way to publish your work in a scientific journal. The peer-review is a service that we, as scientists, provide for journal editors to help decide whether work is suitable for publication in their journal. The early peer-review attempts took place at the beginning of the 18th century. Yet the peer-review was not widely adopted by the scientific community until the mid-20th century, and many iconic papers, including the ones on the structure of the DNA, were not peer-reviewed (Baldwin, 2015).

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Topics: Science Careers, Open Science

Save Time with Transient Plant Leaf Transformations

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jul 25, 2019 8:03:52 AM

This post was contributed by Samuel Mortensen, a PhD candidate at Northeastern University.

Working with plants doesn’t always have to be a time-consuming process. While developing transgenic hairy root lines in tissue cultures takes half a year, and generating a transgenic plant can take even longer, a transient plant leaf transformation process could save the plant biologist some time… months, in fact.

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Topics: Plant Biology

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