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Technologies Enabled by NanoLuc® Luciferase

Posted by Guest Blogger on Feb 8, 2018 7:17:02 AM

This post was contributed by Kyle Hooper at Promega.

Researchers have been sharing plasmids ever since there were plasmids to share. Back when I was in the lab, if you read a paper and saw an interesting construct you wished to use, you could either make it yourself or you could “clone by phone”. One of my professors was excellent at phone cloning with labs around the world and had specific strategies and tactics for getting the plasmids he wanted. Addgene makes it so much easier to share your constructs from lab to lab. Promega supports the Addgene mission statement: Accelerate research and discovery by improving access to useful research materials and information. Many of our technology platforms like HaloTag® Fusion Protein, codon-optimized Firefly luciferase genes (e.g., luc2), and NanoLuc® Luciferase are available from the repository. We encourage people to go to Addgene to get new innovative tools. Afterall, isn’t science better when we share?

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Topics: Fluorescent Proteins

In Vivo Biotinylation of Bacterial Fusion Proteins

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jan 25, 2018 9:09:35 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger Jon Backstrom, a biochemist in the Vanderbilt Eye Institute and Tonia Rex's lab.

A common strategy to determine the binding kinetics of a purified protein involves immobilization on a solid support. This allows washing away of unbound material to calculate the amount of bound ligand (after subtracting out non-specific binding). Historically, glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins have been immobilized on a reduced glutathione matrix. The advantage of a fusion protein is the efficient purification of an already immobilized target protein. The disadvantage is that the GST moiety, which forms dimers, may influence binding kinetics of the target ligand. Another important consideration is whether the affinity of an experimental protein-ligand interaction approaches that of GST-glutathione.

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Topics: Plasmid Technology, Hot Plasmids, Techniques

Visualizing Protein Turnover In Situ

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jan 16, 2018 10:20:10 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger, Eugenia Rojas.

A question worthy of a PhD: How do you visualize protein turnover within a neuron?

For my PhD I studied a synaptic protein that is linked to neurodegeneration. The level of this protein is decreased in Alzheimer’s disease patient’s brains. However, it is not known why or how this happens. Therefore, I set out to study how protein turnover is regulated in neurons.

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Topics: Blog

Identifying Sequence Elements with SnapGene's Feature Database

Posted by Guest Blogger on Dec 21, 2017 9:06:58 AM

This post was contribued by guest bloggers Aline and Benjamin Glick from SnapGene.

SnapGene was created to meet a need. While there were software tools available to biomedical researchers manipulating DNA sequences on a daily basis, many found these tools inadequate for planning, visualizing, and documenting their procedures. Preventable errors in the design of cloning strategies set experiments back days or even weeks. Primer design was done painstakingly by hand. Records of plasmid construction were often incomplete or nonexistent. In the 21st century, many molecular biologists didn’t know the complete sequences or properties of the DNA molecules they were using.

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Topics: Plasmid Technology, Blog

Advice on Career Paths and the Green Card Process for International Researchers and Entrepreneurs

Posted by Guest Blogger on Dec 20, 2017 9:33:58 AM

This post was contributed by guest bloggers Lauren Celano of Propel Careers and Rachel Casseus, Esq. Founder of Casseus Law.

Disclaimer: The contents of this post are intended to convey general information only and not to provide legal advice or opinions. The contents of this post should not be relied upon for legal advice in any particular circumstance or fact situation.  The information presented may not reflect the most current legal developments.  Further, this post may contain technical inaccuracies or typographical errors.  No action should be taken in reliance on the information contained in this post and we disclaim all liability in respect to actions taken or not taken based on any or all the contents of this post.  An attorney should be contacted for advice on specific legal issues. 

The permanent residence “green card” process is a necessary and often overlooked part of career development for foreign national researchers and entrepreneurs who are looking to continue their careers in the United States. There has been a growing shift away from employers sponsoring individuals for green cards because of the cost, long timeline and uncertainty associated with filing a permanent residence case with United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). If it were up to us, we would give everyone with a Ph.D. a green card, but until we get elected to Congress, we are tasked with working with US immigration in its current state. As of September 2017, USCIS received 116,224 employment based green card applications and approved 91,023 during the first 3 quarters of 2017. As an international researcher and aspiring entrepreneur, you have many career options available to you including careers in academia, industry, non-profit, and government sectors.  Within these sectors, you could start your own company, work in a bench research career or a non-bench research career such as law, medical/technical writing, clinical, regulatory, product development, business development, consulting, policy, big data and the list goes on and on.

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Topics: Career

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