Latest Posts

All Posts

Susanna Bachle

Susanna Bachle is an Outreach Scientist at Addgene interested in Open Science, Global Health and organizing events inside and outside Addgene. You can follow her on Twitter @SusannaMBachle.

Recent Posts

A New Generation of Adenine Base Editors Improves Editing in Primary Human Cells

Posted by Susanna Bachle on May 7, 2020 9:15:00 AM

Adenine base editors (ABE) mediate A•T-to-G•C base changes (Figure 1), but it can be challenging to make these base changes, especially in primary human cells. Now, scientists at Beam Therapeutics have found a way to improve editing in primary human cells (Gaudelli et al., 2020).

One of the widely used base editing systems, ABE7.10 (and the starting point for a new generation of ABEs), consists of 3 components: 

  • a deaminase (TadA, originally from E.coli, named TadA7.10 in ABE7.10) 
  • a catalytically impaired Cas protein (dCas or Cas nickase) 
  • a guide RNA that targets the complex of TadA and dCas to the genomic DNA of interest 
Read More >

Topics: CRISPR, Base Editing

Expanding the Targeting Scope and Editing Efficiency of Adenine Base Editors

Posted by Susanna Bachle on Mar 17, 2020 9:32:55 AM

David Liu’s lab created the first base editor in 2016 (Komor et al., 2016) and since then has been trying to expand their precision editing capabilities. Base editors make specific DNA base changes and consist of a catalytically impaired Cas protein (dCas or Cas nickase) fused to a DNA-modifying enzyme, in this case a deaminase. Base changes from C•G-to-T•A are mediated by cytosine base editors (CBEs) and base changes from A•T-to-G•C are mediated by adenine base editors (ABEs). How does this work? Through molecular biology teamwork. The guide RNA (gRNA) specifies the editing target site on the DNA, the Cas domain directs the modifying enzyme to the target site, and the deaminase induces the DNA base change without a DNA double-strand break. But base editors aren’t perfect. They may be slow, can only target certain sites, or make only a subset of base substitutions. 

Read More >

Topics: CRISPR, Base Editing

Three Key Considerations For Precise Neuronal Targeting Using AAV Technologies

Posted by Susanna Bachle on Nov 27, 2019 9:03:45 AM

Understanding the biology behind brain development, learning, and behavior poses many challenges in neuroscience with many brain regions, neuronal networks, and specific neuronal populations to consider. To tease apart how different neurons impact a certain output, neuroscientists have begun to use more precise genetic tools: activators, inhibitors, sensors, recombinases, and more. With the help of adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV), neuroscientists can combine classical genetic tools with the manipulation of specific neuronal subtypes and determine how these changes affect the phenotype. Viral vectors and genetic approaches are continuously refined and developed so there are many combinations to choose from for your experiments!

Read More >

Topics: Viral Vectors, Viral Vector Protocols and Tips, AAV

Microbes: Look, Listen, and Tell

Posted by Susanna Bachle on Aug 28, 2018 8:04:13 AM

When you think about going to a scientific conference, you may think about sitting amongst a sea of chairs listening to talks all day. But nope, not at the American Society for Microbiology 2018 Microbe meeting. Soon after I arrived, I was looking through a paper-based, affordable, and portable microscope called the ‘foldscope’ (Dr. Prakash, Stanford University). Right there on the floor outside the lecture hall.

Read More >

Topics: Microbiology, Other

Popular Retroviral Vectors and Their Uses in Scientific Research

Posted by Susanna Bachle on Jul 24, 2018 8:51:21 AM

Viruses are intracellular parasites and natural vehicles for genetic information. Therefore they make excellent tools for genetic engineering. There are several different viral vectors to choose from, for example gamma-retrovirus, lentivirus, Adenovirus, and Adeno-associated virus (AAV). If you are wondering which virus fits you experiments best have a look at this viral vector overview.

Read More >

Topics: Viral Vectors, Retroviral and Lentiviral Vectors

Click here to subscribe to the Addgene Blog
 
Subscribe

 

All Topics

see all

Recent Posts