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Aliyah Weinstein

Aliyah Weinstein is Addgene’s Marketing and Communications Manager. She has a research background in cancer immunology and is engaged in science writing and advocating for equity in STEM. Outside of science, Aliyah enjoys yoga, board games, and traveling. You can find Aliyah on Twitter @desabsurdites.

Recent Posts

#DeckTheLab and Win Prizes from Addgene

Posted by Aliyah Weinstein on Nov 26, 2019 8:52:50 AM

We’ve already had our first snow at Addgene HQ in Boston, and it’s gotten us all into the holiday spirit. Decorations have started to go up around the office and labs already, and we’ll keep decorating our space as winter and the holidays get closer.

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Topics: Fun at Addgene, Addgene News

Celebrate National Book Month with Addgene

Posted by Aliyah Weinstein on Oct 3, 2019 8:47:00 AM

From Addgene Book Club to our on-site book swap/library, reading is part of the culture here at Addgene. Since it’s National Book Month, we’ve asked some Addgenies to share their favorite books - both scientific and not - to inspire you to read a little more this October.

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Topics: Inside Addgene, Addgene News

Mouse Modeling, Part 2: Breeding and Crossing Mice

Posted by Aliyah Weinstein on Aug 6, 2019 8:55:01 AM

In Part 1 of our mouse modeling blog series, we covered techniques that can be used to introduce genetic modifications into mouse embryos. But once you generate a growing colony of genetically engineered mice, what can you do? In this post, we’ll cover why and how to cross mice to create double knockout lines and Cre-lox lines, and how to properly control for genetically engineered mice in your experiment.

As you’ve learned in Part 1, there are many types of genetically engineered mice: transgenic mice, knockin and knockout mice, and conditional knockin or knockout mice. While these techniques are each useful for introducing one modification into the mouse genome, they are not commonly used to introduce multiple mutations. This is because as more mutations are introduced into a single embryo, the likelihood that a mouse will end up with the intended genotype at every allele decreases.

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Topics: Genome Editing, Cre-lox

Mouse Modeling, Part 1: Genetically Engineered Mice

Posted by Aliyah Weinstein on Jul 11, 2019 9:26:08 AM

Mice are a common model organism used to understand mammalian traits and genetically engineered mouse models provide researchers with useful and adaptable tools to perform basic and preclinical research. For scientists new to using mouse models, the possibilities may seem endless - and overwhelming.

In the first blog post in this series, I’ll highlight terminology you should be familiar with before working with mouse models, several common techniques used to create engineered mouse models at embryonic stages, and the pros and cons of different genome editing techniques.

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Topics: Genome Editing

Multicolor Animals: Using Fluorescent Proteins to Understand Single Cell Behavior

Posted by Aliyah Weinstein on Mar 5, 2019 8:08:52 AM

Stochastic multicolor labeling is a popular technique in neuroscience and developmental biology. This type of cell labeling technique involves the introduction of a transgene construct containing fluorescent proteins (XFP) of different colors to label an organ or entire organism. Because each cell can have multiple copies of the transgene that will recombine independently, cells may acquire one of a variety of colors when a combination of XFP are expressed. Each cell remains the same color for its entire lifetime and daughter cells retain the same color, allowing for the fate mapping of cell populations over time. The ability to track single cell dynamics at the organism level has been made possible by tools that allow cells to become persistently fluorescent during development. Stochastic multicolor labeling systems, many based on Brainbow, now exist for a variety of species, cell types, and research applications.

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Topics: Fluorescent Proteins, Cell Tracing, Neuroscience

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