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Aliyah Weinstein

Aliyah Weinstein is Addgene’s Marketing and Communications Manager. She has a research background in cancer immunology and is engaged in science writing and advocating for equity in STEM. Outside of science, Aliyah enjoys yoga, board games, and traveling. You can find Aliyah on Twitter @desabsurdites.

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Multicolor Animals: Using Fluorescent Proteins to Understand Single Cell Behavior

Posted by Aliyah Weinstein on Mar 5, 2019 8:08:52 AM

Stochastic multicolor labeling is a popular technique in neuroscience and developmental biology. This type of cell labeling technique involves the introduction of a transgene construct containing fluorescent proteins (XFP) of different colors to label an organ or entire organism. Because each cell can have multiple copies of the transgene that will recombine independently, cells may acquire one of a variety of colors when a combination of XFP are expressed. Each cell remains the same color for its entire lifetime and daughter cells retain the same color, allowing for the fate mapping of cell populations over time. The ability to track single cell dynamics at the organism level has been made possible by tools that allow cells to become persistently fluorescent during development. Stochastic multicolor labeling systems, many based on Brainbow, now exist for a variety of species, cell types, and research applications.

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Topics: Fluorescent Proteins

The Fluorescent Vegetables in Aptamer Soup

Posted by Aliyah Weinstein on Jan 29, 2019 9:27:00 AM

If you’re been following Addgene on #souptwitter or if you just enjoy a warm meal on a winter day, you should be happy to learn that many DNA-based reagents are named for soup ingredients! From pSOUP to mCherry, satisfying ingredients reagents permeate the molecular biologist’s kitchen lab - and scientists using aptamers might know this best, as most fluorescent aptamers are named for a fruit or vegetable!

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Topics: Fluorescent Proteins

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