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Transferable Skills Guide: Time Management

Posted by Tyler Ford on Dec 5, 2017 8:52:56 AM

A recent survey of PhDs found that many researchers feel that they lack formal training in a variety of transferable skills. At Addgene we've set out to fill this gap by both highlighting that researchers do learn MANY transferable skills while working in the lab and by offering advice on areas where you might need some help. Today in our transferable skills guide: Time Mangement for Scientists.

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Topics: Science Careers, Professional Development

Transferable Skills Guide: Teamwork

Posted by Eric J. Perkins on Nov 28, 2017 9:00:00 AM

recent survey of PhDs found that many researchers feel that they lack formal training in a variety of transferable skills. At Addgene we've set out to fill this gap by both highlighting that researchers do learn MANY transferable skills while working in the lab and by offering advice on areas where you might need some help. Today: Teamwork.

My first experience on a successful scientific team came as an undergrad at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Though some WPI students chose to go the solo route for their Major Qualifying Project (or MQP, the school’s equivalent of a senior thesis), I knew early on that I wanted to work with a partner. WPI’s emphasis on teamwork was what drew me to the school in the first place. The famous discoveries and experiments I’d been learning about for years were usually the products of teams: Watson, Crick, & Franklin, Meselson-Stahl, Hershey-Chase...Who was I to dispute history? And boy did I make the right decision. If I’d spent my senior year isolating pheromones from various C. elegans mutants by myself, I would have slowly gone crazy. As it was, my partner Mike and I split the work, shared the credit, and we both won accolades that would launch our careers in science.

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Topics: Science Careers, Professional Development

Transferable Skills Guide: Career Planning Resources

Posted by Michael G. Lemieux on Nov 14, 2017 9:00:00 AM

recent survey of PhDs found that many researchers feel that they lack formal training in a variety of transferable skills. At Addgene we've set out to fill this gap by both highlighting that researchers do learn MANY transferable skills while working in the lab and by offering advice on areas where you might need some help. Today: Career Planning Resources.

The key to ensuring success during graduate school and beyond is to live in your lab, right? Wrong! While it is clearly a good idea to be diligent in your research, remember that you will not be a graduate student or postdoc forever, and you need to be thinking about what comes next. To that end, one of the most important things that you can do now is diversify. Read on for an overview of some of the resources you can use to better prepare for your career, and increase your chances of landing that next coveted job!

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Topics: Science Careers, Professional Development

Science communication: 9 Strategies to Get Your Foot in the Door

Posted by Guest Blogger on Sep 27, 2017 9:23:01 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger Sarah Schmidt, a Marie Curie Fellow at The Sainsbury Laboratory.

Are you a science student or early career researcher looking to break into science communication? Everybody goes about this in their own way. The career paths into science communication are as varied as the field itself. Among other things, science communication comprises broadcasting, science writing, and certain aspects of art and education. If you suspect that science communication might be for you, don’t wait. Start communicating now. These 9 strategies will get you started: 

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Topics: Science Careers, Science Communication, Professional Development

10 Steps to a Perfect Science Talk

Posted by Joanne Kamens on Aug 23, 2016 10:30:00 AM

Like graphing data, choosing controls, or mixing clear solutions—public speaking is skill that any scientist can learn.  Any time you give a science talk, you are also giving a job talk. Even if not being interviewed, there could always be a future boss in the room, so it is a good idea to start thinking about public speaking early and often. Two of my jobs have indirectly resulted from someone seeing me speak in a non-interview setting. There are many resources on self-promotion (how hard it is for some people, especially women), visibility (how to get it, especially if introverted ), and networking (how to get people to remember you). What better way to accomplish all of these things naturally than to give a dynamite presentation?  To that end, let’s chat about giving science talks and how to make them serve you well. The happy byproduct might just be a career opportunity.

Check out Joanne's Reddit AMA

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Topics: Science Careers, Professional Development, Early Career Researcher

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