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Plasmids 101: Cre-lox

Posted by A Max Juchheim on Jan 13, 2015 10:47:00 AM

In previous posts for our Plasmids 101 series, we examined a number of important plasmid elements – promoters, origins of replication, protein tags, and antibiotic resistance markers (just to name a few). In this edition, we’re going to take a look at a very interesting tool that can be used for creating (excuse the pun) specific, targeted DNA modifications in transgenic animals, embryonic stem cells, and/or tissue-specific cell types: Cre-lox recombination.

What is Cre-lox?

The Cre-lox system is a technology that can be used to induce site-specific recombination events. The system consists of two components derived from the P1 bacteriophage: the Cre recombinase and a loxP recognition site. The P1 bacteriophage uses these components as part of its natural viral lifecycle, and researchers have adapted the components for use in genome manipulation.

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Topics: Plasmid Technology, Plasmid Elements, Plasmids 101

Management for Scientists: Seeking Feedback

Posted by Joanne Kamens on Jan 8, 2015 9:34:00 AM

This is the second in a 5 part series on Management for scientists. Subscribe to the Addgene Career Advice Posts here.

This second installment in the Management for Scientists series will focus on an aspect of communication especially important for a manager – getting feedback from the team. Successful management can almost be boiled down to one, key concept: Creating a culture of excellent, effective communication between all members of a team. As described here in a 2012 Intuit blog post, a study coming out of MITs Human Dynamics Laboratory identified five characteristics of very successful teams.

Check out Joanne's Reddit AMA

Here they are annotated with my comments:

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Topics: Career, Management for Scientists

22 Hot Plasmid Technologies from 2014

Posted by Joanne Kamens on Jan 6, 2015 12:21:53 PM

Updated Mini-transposon Vector for Bacterial Mutagenesis or Gene Targeting

Victor de Lorenzo's lab has engineered a modular mini-Tn5 vector that can be used to generate random mutagenesis libraries or to insert heterologous genes, reporters, or other markers into a target genome. They did this by selecting the important elements from existing transposon and vector systems and creating an all-synthetic vector that included only the elements needed for function.

The lab validated this vector, called pBAM1, by conducting random mutagenesis in the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida and demonstrate that they can successfully create GFP fusion proteins with a variety of genes across the genome. Although this tool was published in 2011, it was only recently made available through Addgene and we want to highlight it for use in your research.

Check out Joanne's Reddit AMA

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Topics: Hot Plasmids, Lab Tips, Plasmid Kits

Resume Writing for Non-academic Science Careers

Posted by Guest Blogger on Dec 18, 2014 11:06:00 AM

This post was contributed by Theresa Liao of the University of British Columbia.

When transitioning from an academic science career path to a non-academic one, one of the biggest changes (and perhaps challenges) is the need to present yourself using a resume. Indeed, instead of having all the pages in a Curricula Vitae to showcase your publications, academic performances, and research experiences, you now have merely two pages to convince your potential employer that you are the right candidate for the job.

How can you incorporate the skills developed during graduate school into your resume? How can you stand out among all the candidates applying for the position?

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Topics: Career, Science Communication, Career Readiness

Addgene’s Top 10 Blog Posts from 2014

Posted by Caroline LaManna on Dec 16, 2014 3:01:00 PM

As 2014 comes to a close, we’ve been reflecting on the past year in science – as seen through the lens of Addgene’s blog and plasmid repository. Our blog is just over a year old, and it has grown steadily during 2014. We were excited to have more and more scientists offering to share their stories – about their research, their job hunts, and their tips for experiments. We’ve also loved helping to answer your plasmid and cloning questions through our Plasmids 101 series and by responding to your comments.

Additionally we’ve seen what topics are of interest to you, our readers. Below I’ve compiled a list of the Top 10 Most Viewed Posts on our blog from the past year. A quick glance shows that interest in CRISPR continues to grow as the genome editing technique has developed and improved. The CRISPR posts written by our guest bloggers, the experts in the CRISPR/Cas field, have been extremely helpful for scientists that are looking for more detailed information about this new technology. Our Plasmids 101 series continues to grab scientists’ attention, and as we move into next year we’d like to know what topics you want to learn more about. Our post on “Making Your Own Competent Cells” has been extremely popular, generating many additional questions. We’re happy to see scientists making their own cells to save money and create the tools that work best for their needs.

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Topics: Scientific Sharing, News

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