SciComm with the Experts at Science in the News Part 2

Posted by Tyler Ford on Apr 27, 2017 10:30:00 AM

This is the second half of a two-part interview with Vini Mani and Amy Gilson from Science in the News (SITN) at Harvard University.

There are tons of ways you can get involved in science communication. In this second half of our conversation with Vini Mani and Amy Gilson from SITN, we discuss some of the many things you can do start your own science communication student group and get more involved with your local community. What do Vini and Amy say is the quickest way to get things started? Set up your own Science by the Pint series and organize evens where scientists can grab a beer and chat about their work at a local bar. It doesn't have to be crazy complicated! Listen to the full podcast for more great science communication tips or listen to the chapters we've broken down below for specific topics discussed during the interview. Happy listening!

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Topics: Science Communication, Podcast

March for Science

Posted by Guest Blogger on Apr 21, 2017 10:30:00 AM


This post was contributed by guest blogger, Stephanie Hays, 
a scientist with a passion for photosynthetic communities, microbial interactions, and science education. 

Disclaimer: The views presented in this article are those of the author do not represent a formal stance taken by Addgene or its staff.

In Washington, D.C. as well as sister locations on April 22, 2017, scientists and non-scientists alike will march to advocate for science’s place in education, government, and civilization in general (1).

Science and Politics?

Science is an apolitical process for seeking knowledge. The process begins with a testable hypothesis - an educated guess about how some part of the world functions. Experiments come next, testing the correctness of the hypothesis. The results of experiments can help support or reject a hypothesis. Looking at the data, scientists then revise their hypotheses and the cycle begins again. No part of this process is inherently political so why is there a march in Washington, D.C., the seat of the United States government?

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Topics: Career, News, Science Communication

SciComm with the Experts at Science in the News Part 1

Posted by Tyler Ford on Mar 16, 2017 9:06:22 AM

This is the first half of a two-part interview with Vini Mani and Amy Gilson from Science in the News at Harvard University.

Effective science communication is required to promote public support for research and to keep useful discoveries coming. At Addgene, we’re huge supporters of science communication. To help you think about ways to effectively communicate your science, we sat down with Vini Mani and Amy Gilson from Science in the News, a graduate student organization that works to promote science communication. Science in the News hosts a podcastseminars, a blog, conferences, and more for non-scientists. These programs are all run and organized by graduate student researchers. That’s right, #ActualLivingScientists, eager to communicate their science. In this first half of our two-part interview with Vini and Amy, we’ll discuss the types of programs SITN runs and learn how they think about communicating science.

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Topics: Scientific Sharing, Science Communication, Podcast

5 Science Rap Videos & Their Creator: Tom McFadden

Posted by Tyler Ford on Feb 9, 2017 10:30:00 AM

Science rap mastermind, Tom McFadden, recently worked with high school students in the bay area to create a plasmid rap video for us (If you’re new to plasmids, we highly recommend checking out the video). Tom has made many more Science rap videos to teach students around the globe and is pushing SciComm further with his new company, Science with Tom. In this podcast, we learn more about Tom and pick his brain for advice on how to dive into new forms of science communication.

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Topics: Interview, Science Communication, Podcast

Bricking Science: Portraying Scientific Reality Through LEGO

Posted by Guest Blogger on Nov 29, 2016 10:30:00 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger, Dalila Cunha de Oliveira.

Bricking Science is an idea built, literally, 'brick-by-brick' to introduce people all around the world to the lives of researchers and PhD students.

Everybody in science knows that there are many ways your experiments can go wrong. Whether it be a bad fridge freezing your samples, or a dysregulated water bath boiling your experiments, just about anything can disrupt your bench work and sometimes no culprit can be found…. In our lab we call this mysterious source of failure the lab gnome.

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Topics: Fun, Scientific Sharing, Science Communication

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