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Gaining Leadership Skills Volunteering at a Professional Organization

Posted by Guest Blogger on Aug 6, 2015 10:30:00 AM

The follow post was contributed by guest blogger Juliet Moncaster

Leadership skills are amongst the professional abilities we often hear that scientists should acquire during their PhD and postdoctoral training. Addgene executive director Joanne Kamens has written a 5-part blog on the topic:  http://blog.addgene.org/management-for-scientists-managing-vs-leading.

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Topics: Career, Career Readiness

Seeing Red: Simple GFP Photoconversion

Posted by Mary Gearing on Aug 4, 2015 10:30:00 AM

Since the first research applications of GFP were published in the 1990s, biologists have spent a lot of time making things glow. Chances are you’ve used a GFP derivative to conduct subcellular localization studies or make a reporter construct. Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are also the foundation of multiple important technologies, including FRET and optogenetics. Even though GFP has been so thoroughly characterized, it turns out this protein has a few more secrets - during a collaboration, members of Maureen Hanson’s and Rima Menassa's labs made the accidental discovery that laser treatment can photoconvert GFP from green to RED! This simple technique has been shown to work in plant, Drosophila and mammalian cells, and it may find wide use in biological research.

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Topics: Fluorescent Proteins

CRISPR 101: Validating Your Genome Edit

Posted by Melina Fan on Jul 30, 2015 10:30:00 AM

You’ve created your gRNA expression construct and used Cas9 to introduce it into your target cells. Hooray! You’re ready to begin reading out data, right? Almost. In this blog post we’ll explain how to verify that your cells were appropriately edited. We’ll also cover the basic techniques for detecting insertion, deletion, and mutation events.

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Topics: Genome Engineering, CRISPR, CRISPR 101

Protein Tagging with CRISPR/Cas9: A Conversation with Mendenhall and Myers

Posted by Kendall Morgan on Jul 28, 2015 10:30:00 AM

As Eric Mendenhall of the University of Alabama in Huntsville explains it, a major goal in his laboratory is to understand the function of the non-coding portion of the genome. Mendenhall and Richard Myers of HudsonAlpha (where Mendenhall is also an adjunct faculty member) have together been working toward this goal for years as members of the ENCyclopedia of DNA Elements Project (ENCODE), an NIH-funded effort to define all of the functional elements in the human genome.

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Topics: Interview, CRISPR

Experimenting in an Open Source lab: from CRISPR to Cats

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jul 23, 2015 10:30:00 AM

The following post was contributed by Derek Jacoby from Makerspace Victoria, CA

Over the decades science has become increasingly restricted to academic and industrial labs, but recently there has been a counter movement by the public to access basic equipment and to become involved in developing tools and solutions to research problems. This movement calls itself the Open Science movement and is part of a bigger movement in a variety of research sectors to provide open source technologies and spaces where interested parties can do research. This interest manifested itself in the creation of Hackerspaces and Makerspaces back in 2007, which function as centres for peer learning and knowledge sharing, in the form of workshops, presentations, and lectures. There are currently around 1,000 active makerspaces around the world. Hackerspaces.org maintains a list of active spaces near you.

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Topics: Scientific Sharing

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