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Hot Plasmids Episode 4: B. subtilis Libraries, iPSC Reprogramming, CRISPR Tools, & More!

Posted by Tyler Ford on Dec 11, 2017 9:02:49 AM

In the fourth episode of our Hot Plasmids podcast series, you'll learn about new libraries for studying B. subtilis biology, plasmids for enhancing iPSC production, and CRISPR tools for plants. You can find additional hot plasmids in our quarterly newsletter or on our hot plasmids webpage.

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Topics: Hot Plasmids, Optogenetics, CRISPR, Podcast

Hot Plasmids Podcast Episode 3: Optogenetics Tools, Improved CRISPR Base Editors, & More!

Posted by Tyler Ford on Oct 25, 2017 9:00:00 AM

In the third episode of our Hot Plasmids podcast series, you'll learn about optogenetics tools for controlling protein activity, methods for increasing CRISPR editing efficiency, new CRISPR base editors, DIY DNA ladders. You can find additional hot plasmids in our quarterly newsletter or on our hot plasmids webpage.

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Topics: Hot Plasmids, Optogenetics, CRISPR, Podcast

Optogenetics + CRISPR, Using Light to Control Genome Editing

Posted by Caroline LaManna on Mar 8, 2016 10:30:00 AM

Scientists around the world have been making major improvements to CRISPR technology since its initial applications for genome engineering in 2012. (Check out our CRISPR 101 eBook for everything you need to know about CRISPR.) Like CRISPR, optogenetics has also been making headlines over the past decade. Optogenetics uses genetically encoded tools, such as microbial opsins, to control cellular activities using light. In 2015, scientists combined CRISPR and optogenetics techniques to develop a variety of photoactivatable CRISPR tools. These tools allow scientists to use light to externally control the location, timing, and reversibility of the genome editing process. Read on to learn about the various light-controlled CRISPR tools available to researchers - some readily found at Addgene.

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Topics: Optogenetics, CRISPR

Important Considerations in Optogenetics Behavioral Experiments

Posted by Guest Blogger on Oct 1, 2015 10:30:00 AM

This post is part of our Primer on Optogenetics and was contributed by guest blogger Derek Simon.

The actual experiments you do will be determined by the topic you’re interested in studying, but, in today’s post, we’ll discuss some of the important considerations you should think about when developing optogenetics behavioral experiments. There are far too many behaviors that have utilized optogenetics to be fully summarized in a short blog post, but some examples I’m personally interested in include: intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) and place preference. The lab I work in (the Kreek lab) focuses on the neurobiology of addictive diseases, which means we are interested in circuits that mediate drug taking behavior. If a circuit reinforces behavior (activation of the circuit promotes subsequent, repeated activation), this is an approximation of reward or the sense of pleasure that the animal perceives through taking a drug. The ideal behaviors to test reinforcement are ICSS and place preference.

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Topics: Optogenetics, Lab Tips, Primer on Optogenetics

The Materials Science of Optogenetics Experiments

Posted by Guest Blogger on Sep 17, 2015 10:30:00 AM

This post is part of our Primer on Optogenetics and was contributed by guest blogger Derek Simon.

The surgeries and standard molecular neuroscience validation experiments we discussed last week are only half of the battle when using optogentics to answer a research question. The flip side of the optogenetics coin is materials science-based. Light is delivered to your opsin through a small piece of fiber optic cable implanted into the animal’s skull (right). The fiber optic cable is threaded throughand fixed to—an optical insulator called a ferrule (below). The fiber optic cable/ferrule is inserted into the target brain region using stereotaxic surgery and cemented to the animal’s skull using dental cement (a similar procedure as implanting a guide cannula). A fiber optic patch cable is then connected from laser to ferrule to deliver light pulses to the target brain region.

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Topics: Optogenetics, Techniques, Primer on Optogenetics

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