Susanna Bachle

Susanna Bachle is an Outreach Scientist at Addgene interested in Open Science, Global Health and organizing events inside and outside Addgene. You can follow her on Twitter @SusannaMBachle.

Recent Posts

Addgene-Seeding Labs Plasmid Grant: Accelerating Science Globally - 5 Scientists, 4 Countries & 3 Continents!

Posted by Susanna Bachle on Jul 18, 2017 8:41:28 AM

Accelerating science and supporting scientists globally are the shared mission of both Seeding Labs and Addgene. The Addgene-Seeding Labs plasmid grant is a collaborative endeavor providing plasmids to researchers in developing countries. We are proud to introduce the 5 scientists who were awarded the Addgene-Seeding Labs Plasmid grant this year. These scientists work on projects spanning from the identification of plant compounds and insecticidal proteins to the development of renewable biotechnology products and biosensors for herbicides as well as developing yeast as source for dietary supplements!

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Topics: Scientific Sharing, Investigator Feature, Seeding Labs

Cancer, Inflammation and Immunity - Harnessing the Body’s Defenses to Fight Cancer

Posted by Susanna Bachle on Jul 6, 2017 9:59:43 AM

Research tackling questions in the fields of Cancer, Inflammation and Immunity, as well as various combinations thereof (so called “Immuno-Oncology”) is exploding. Researchers are increasingly able to harness the body’s immune system to fight progressing cancers. It was inspiring to participate in the 2017 Cell Symposium on Cancer, Inflammation and Immunity and learn more about “... recent findings in basic immunology, cancer-immune cell interactions, cancer immunotherapy, as well as new approaches to reprogramming tumor-associated inflammation for therapeutic benefit ”as stated by the organizers.

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Topics: Cancer

Plasmids 101: Visualizing Subcellular Structures & Organelles

Posted by Susanna Bachle on Jun 22, 2017 10:30:00 AM

The same way the human body is made up of organs, cells comprise compartments and structures, called organelles. Take a sneak peak inside a cell with the images from the Allen Cell Explorer (1).

When studying the function of a protein or its role in a disease, researchers often isolate proteins of interest and examine them using biochemical methods thus removing the context of the cell. However, much knowledge about functionality can be gained by understanding the location and transport of the protein within a living cell. Analyzing differences in protein localization and transport between healthy and diseased states can also provide interesting insights into disease mechanisms and protein function.

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Topics: Fluorescent Proteins

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