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Don’t Wait To Launch Your Health Science Startup

Posted by Guest Blogger on Aug 25, 2015 10:30:00 AM

Being an entrepreneur is difficult; it requires an immense amount of self-knowledge and an unwavering devotion to seeing your ideas become something tangible.  When you think of entrepreneurship in the 21st century, who do you think of?  Your mind is likely drawn to the Mark Zuckerbergs and Evan Spiegels of the world – individuals in their 20’s who’ve built multibillion dollar tech companies using only laptops and some server space.

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Topics: Career, Networking, Career Readiness

A Career in Grants: How To Become a Grant Professional

Posted by Guest Blogger on Aug 20, 2015 10:30:00 AM

This post was contributed by Jo Miller, founder and principal of J. Miller & Associates, Inc., a national grant consulting firm, and Smartegrants, a grant professional development firm

The path to a career as a Grant Professional has been a long and winding path for many in the field. The vast majority of grant professionals didn’t plan on becoming grant writers. When we asked others about how they became grant professionals, mid- to late-career grant professionals have similar stories about a time when their passion for an organization or a program and a funding opportunity coincided, and they stepped up to apply for a grant which lead to their new career path.  A part of the career path story for most established grant professionals is learning to succeed in grants through trial and error, through winning and losing funding, and by finding our individual niches within the field of grants.

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Topics: Career

Gaining Leadership Skills Volunteering at a Professional Organization

Posted by Guest Blogger on Aug 6, 2015 10:30:00 AM

The follow post was contributed by guest blogger Juliet Moncaster

Leadership skills are amongst the professional abilities we often hear that scientists should acquire during their PhD and postdoctoral training. Addgene executive director Joanne Kamens has written a 5-part blog on the topic:  http://blog.addgene.org/management-for-scientists-managing-vs-leading.

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Topics: Career, Career Readiness

Experimenting in an Open Source lab: from CRISPR to Cats

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jul 23, 2015 10:30:00 AM

The following post was contributed by Derek Jacoby from Makerspace Victoria, CA

Over the decades science has become increasingly restricted to academic and industrial labs, but recently there has been a counter movement by the public to access basic equipment and to become involved in developing tools and solutions to research problems. This movement calls itself the Open Science movement and is part of a bigger movement in a variety of research sectors to provide open source technologies and spaces where interested parties can do research. This interest manifested itself in the creation of Hackerspaces and Makerspaces back in 2007, which function as centres for peer learning and knowledge sharing, in the form of workshops, presentations, and lectures. There are currently around 1,000 active makerspaces around the world. Hackerspaces.org maintains a list of active spaces near you.

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Topics: Scientific Sharing

Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jul 16, 2015 10:30:00 AM

This post was contributed by Jae Lee and Pantelis Tsoulfas of the Department of Neurological Surgery at the University of Miami.

The beginning of this century has seen some major advances in light microscopy, particularly related to the neurosciences.  These developments in microscopy coupled with techniques that make tissues transparent are enabling microscopes to visualize the cellular architecture of whole tissues in 3D with unprecedented detail.  One of these advances in microscopy has been light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM). The underlying method was developed in 1902 by Richard Zsigmondy and Henry Siedentopf to enhance the microscopic resolution for studying colloidal gold (1).  The method was based on using a thin plane (sheet) of light generated by sunlight to observe single gold particles with diameters less than 4nm.

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Topics: Imaging, Fluorescent Proteins

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