Tyler Ford

Tyler J. Ford is an Outreach Scientist at Addgene. His professional duties include helping maintain the Addgene blog (blog.addgene.org), talking to people about Addgene, and improving Addgene's services. His non-professional duties include running, biking, drawing, hiking, playing tennis, reading, and writing.
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Recent Posts

New Podcast Segment: Hot Plasmids

Posted by Tyler Ford on May 17, 2017 11:37:42 AM

We’re breaking into more audio and video on the Addgene Blog and Addgene website. As we push forward with these efforts, you’ll find new ways to learn about science careers, lab protocols, and, of course, plasmids. Today we’re trying a new way to present plasmid info with a new segment on the Addgene podcast - The Hot Plasmids Segment. Click on the player below to listen to a quick (~5 min) Hot Plasmids podcast that introduces you to 4 new plasmid technologies from one of our recent newsletters.

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Topics: Podcast

Plasmids 101: Fluorescent Protein Timers

Posted by Tyler Ford on May 4, 2017 10:30:00 AM

Even before fluorescent proteins (FPs) came into wide use, there were a variety of ways to monitor cell, organelle, and protein localization. For instance, you might dye your cells and look at them under a microscope, fractionate samples to isolate particular organelles and their contents, or perform in situ hybridization experiments. In many cases fluorescent proteins have usurped old methods or complemented them in ways that make them much easier. A special class of FPs, the FP timers, add an entire new dimension to monitoring localization; using FP timers, researchers can look at a single image of a cell and understand how protein localization changes over time.
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Topics: Plasmids 101, Fluorescent Proteins

SciComm with the Experts at Science in the News Part 2

Posted by Tyler Ford on Apr 27, 2017 10:30:00 AM

This is the second half of a two-part interview with Vini Mani and Amy Gilson from Science in the News (SITN) at Harvard University.

There are tons of ways you can get involved in science communication. In this second half of our conversation with Vini Mani and Amy Gilson from SITN, we discuss some of the many things you can do start your own science communication student group and get more involved with your local community. What do Vini and Amy say is the quickest way to get things started? Set up your own Science by the Pint series and organize evens where scientists can grab a beer and chat about their work at a local bar. It doesn't have to be crazy complicated! Listen to the full podcast for more great science communication tips or listen to the chapters we've broken down below for specific topics discussed during the interview. Happy listening!

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Topics: Science Communication, Podcast

SciComm with the Experts at Science in the News Part 1

Posted by Tyler Ford on Mar 16, 2017 9:06:22 AM

This is the first half of a two-part interview with Vini Mani and Amy Gilson from Science in the News at Harvard University.

Effective science communication is required to promote public support for research and to keep useful discoveries coming. At Addgene, we’re huge supporters of science communication. To help you think about ways to effectively communicate your science, we sat down with Vini Mani and Amy Gilson from Science in the News, a graduate student organization that works to promote science communication. Science in the News hosts a podcastseminars, a blog, conferences, and more for non-scientists. These programs are all run and organized by graduate student researchers. That’s right, #ActualLivingScientists, eager to communicate their science. In this first half of our two-part interview with Vini and Amy, we’ll discuss the types of programs SITN runs and learn how they think about communicating science.

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Topics: Scientific Sharing, Science Communication, Podcast

Quick New Way to Deposit Plasmids: The Deposit Spreadsheet

Posted by Tyler Ford on Mar 8, 2017 10:15:21 AM

We've been updating our plasmid validation processes to make it easier for you to find what you need in the repository, but we're also making it easier than ever to deposit with Addgene. Our plasmid deposit process can be broken down into three simple steps:

  1. Send Plasmid Information to Addgene
  2. Materials Transfer Agreement approval (MTA)
  3. Send Plasmids Addgene and Quality Control 

Steps 2 and 3 are usually very easy - our tech transfer team will communicate with your university directly to make sure the MTA is taken care of and, once we have all of your plasmid data, we’ll send you prepaid shipping materials (i.e. a deposit kit) with instructions on how to send liquid DNA or bacterial streaks of your plasmid back to us. Our scientists will contact you if any issues arise during the QC process. As the depositing scientist, you will have the most involvement with step 1 and, while data entry can be a chore, we’ve made it easier than ever to send us your plasmid information with the Deposit Spreadsheet.

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Topics: Inside Addgene

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