Easing the Protein Purification Process with pCri

Posted by Mary Gearing on Jun 19, 2015 11:08:00 AM

Protein purification can be one of the most stressful lab activities. Working with proteins requires a substantial amount of properly folded, relatively pure protein, but getting to this stage is often much easier said than done. As reviewed in our Plasmids 101 series, proteins are overexpressed from a plasmid construct, most often in special E. coli strains designed for protein expression. Cultures are then lysed and the protein of interest is purified using an affinity tag. Additional tags may be used to improve protein stability and solubility.

Determining the best way to express one’s protein of interest can save a lot of time later.

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Topics: Hot Plasmids, Plasmid Kits

More Data for You: Find Articles Citing Addgene Plasmids

Posted by Caroline LaManna on Jun 16, 2015 10:15:40 AM

Exciting news! Addgene recently rolled out a new feature on our plasmid pages - links to articles citing this plasmid. Now you can learn how a plasmid has been used by multiple labs and see what experimental systems it has been validated in. 

If a plasmid's Addgene ID # has been referenced in other publications, you'll find a link to the list of citing articles under the "Resource Information" heading in the right column of the plasmid page. Check out the purple arrow in the screenshot below to see what I mean.

Additional Features

Once you've clicked on the "# References" link under the "Resource Information" heading, you'll be directed to a page listing the articles that cite this plasmid. You can use the dropdown to increase the length of the list (purple oval in the screenshot below). You can also use the "Search Table" box at the upper right of the table to search and filter the list of citing articles. From the article list you can click on the PubMed link to find the article abstract and more.

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Topics: Hot Plasmids, Scientific Sharing, Inside Addgene, Using Addgene's Website

Trends in CRISPR and SynBio Technologies [Slideshare]

Posted by Joanne Kamens on Feb 4, 2015 10:58:00 AM

Addgenie Eric Perkins attended the recent Keystone Meeting "Precision Genome Engineering and Synthetic Biology". His reflections on the program are here. This was a great opportunity for Addgene to present our own data on plasmid deposits and distirbution for these fast moving fields. 

Addgene is a global nonprofit plasmid repository. Over 2,000 labs have deposited plasmids to Addgene and we distribute over 130,000 plasmids in 2014. Thus, we are in a unique position to observe and quantify how new technologies are being disseminated through the scientific community.

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Topics: Hot Plasmids, Genome Engineering, Inside Addgene, Synthetic Biology, CRISPR

22 Hot Plasmid Technologies from 2014

Posted by Joanne Kamens on Jan 6, 2015 12:21:53 PM

Updated Mini-transposon Vector for Bacterial Mutagenesis or Gene Targeting

Victor de Lorenzo's lab has engineered a modular mini-Tn5 vector that can be used to generate random mutagenesis libraries or to insert heterologous genes, reporters, or other markers into a target genome. They did this by selecting the important elements from existing transposon and vector systems and creating an all-synthetic vector that included only the elements needed for function.

The lab validated this vector, called pBAM1, by conducting random mutagenesis in the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida and demonstrate that they can successfully create GFP fusion proteins with a variety of genes across the genome. Although this tool was published in 2011, it was only recently made available through Addgene and we want to highlight it for use in your research.

Check out Joanne's Reddit AMA

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Topics: Hot Plasmids, Lab Tips, Plasmid Kits

How Exercise Purges Stress and Keeps Depression at Bay

Posted by Kendall Morgan on Nov 25, 2014 11:02:00 AM

It’s well known that exercise can help fight stress and depression, and now researchers have reported a mechanism based on studies of transgenic mice that helps to explain how it works. The findings in a recent issue of Cell demonstrate how PGC-1a1, a transcriptional coactivator induced in skeletal muscle by exercise and endurance, protects the brain from depression.

Mice that are genetically modified to produce extra PGC-1a1 only in their skeletal muscle show resistance to stressful circumstances – including unpredictable loud noises and flashing lights - that sent average, control mice into depression. In case you were wondering, depression shows up in mice as poorer performance on forced swim tests and less interest in sweets.

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Topics: Hot Plasmids, News

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