Using Addgene's New Viral Service for Your Research

Posted by Tyler Ford on Nov 17, 2016 10:30:00 AM


Instead of spending time and money producing virus from select vectors in the repository yourself, you can now order ready-to-use virus directly from Addgene! As part of our new Viral Service, we’re distributing lentivirus (with many CRISPR tools included among the preps that are currently available) and adeno associated virus (AAV, primarily chemogenetics tools for now but with optogenetic tools coming soon). The viral preparations undergo rigorous quality control testing at Addgene meaning they come ready made to accelerate your research.

 

Need Virus? Check out Addgene's New Viral Service!

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Topics: Inside Addgene, News, Viral Vectors

5 Tips for Troubleshooting Viral Transductions

Posted by Leila Haery on Aug 11, 2016 10:23:59 AM

An estimated 320,000 viruses can infect mammals. Even more abundant are the Earth’s estimated 1031 bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria), many of which are doing important work in our microbiomes. Given that viruses are everywhere and doing everything, it can be annoying when we try to use them in an experiment and they don't do anything.

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Topics: Viral Vectors

AAV: A Versatile Viral Tool for Gene Expression in Mammals

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jul 26, 2016 10:30:00 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger Didem Goz Ayturk, a Postdoctoral Fellow in Connie Cepko’s Lab at Harvard Medical School with edits from Addgenie Karen Guerin.

Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has emerged as a favorite viral tool for both research and clinical applications. AAV can be used to transiently express a gene of interest in a variety of cell types. It was first described about 50 years ago as a contaminant of adenoviral preparations, hence the name (Atchison et al., 1965) AAV is a single stranded, DNA virus belonging to the family Parvoviridae. It has a "simple" genome packaged in an icosahedral capsid. It does not have a lipid coat, also called an envelope, and thus cannot support the addition of a glycoprotein, such as VSV-G, to its surface. In research applications, the genome is typically gutted so that precious cargo space is opened for gene delivery, and for safety. You can easily complement the virus in a tissue culture setting, in other words “in trans”, by supplying the genes that encode the replicase functions and capsid proteins. This gives researchers the ability to produce more virus in a controlled setting. Even though AAV is isolated from a wide range of organisms, it has not been associated with disease, and it is considered a biosafety level 1 (BSL1) viral agent.

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Topics: Viral Vectors

Using Virus in Your Research - A Primer for Beginners

Posted by Leila Haery on Jun 7, 2016 11:09:27 AM


We’ve all had the feeling where it seems like we’re the only one in the room who doesn’t know about an important scientific principle.

Example Scenario

Important science person: ...and then we found out that it wasn’t a deoxynucleotide, it was a dideoxynucleotide!

Room full of important science people: (laughter in unison)

You: (nervous laughter)

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Topics: Viral Vectors

Lentiviral Vector Uses and Overview

Posted by Mary Gearing on May 19, 2016 10:30:00 AM


Lentiviral vectors
are one of the most popular and useful viral vectors in the lab. Advantages of lentivirus include a large genetic capacity and the ability to transduce both dividing and non-dividing cells. Lentiviral vectors are the vector of choice for many CRISPR applications, and they’ve also had success in clinical gene therapy applications. Read on to learn more about the current (and future) applications of lentiviral vectors!

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Topics: Viral Vectors

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