SciComm with the Experts at Science in the News Part 1

Posted by Tyler Ford on Mar 16, 2017 9:06:22 AM

This is the first half of a two-part interview with Vini Mani and Amy Gilson from Science in the News at Harvard University.

Effective science communication is required to promote public support for research and to keep useful discoveries coming. At Addgene, we’re huge supporters of science communication. To help you think about ways to effectively communicate your science, we sat down with Vini Mani and Amy Gilson from Science in the News, a graduate student organization that works to promote science communication. Science in the News hosts a podcastseminars, a blog, conferences, and more for non-scientists. These programs are all run and organized by graduate student researchers. That’s right, #ActualLivingScientists, eager to communicate their science. In this first half of our two-part interview with Vini and Amy, we’ll discuss the types of programs SITN runs and learn how they think about communicating science.

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Topics: Scientific Sharing, Science Communication, Podcast

Bricking Science: Portraying Scientific Reality Through LEGO

Posted by Guest Blogger on Nov 29, 2016 10:30:00 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger, Dalila Cunha de Oliveira.

Bricking Science is an idea built, literally, 'brick-by-brick' to introduce people all around the world to the lives of researchers and PhD students.

Everybody in science knows that there are many ways your experiments can go wrong. Whether it be a bad fridge freezing your samples, or a dysregulated water bath boiling your experiments, just about anything can disrupt your bench work and sometimes no culprit can be found…. In our lab we call this mysterious source of failure the lab gnome.

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Topics: Fun, Scientific Sharing, Science Communication

Tips for Improving Your Next Manuscript

Posted by Guest Blogger on Nov 22, 2016 10:30:00 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger Sean Stacey who recently attended both online and on site courses with the American Society for Microbiology (ASM) Scientific Writing and Publishing Institute.

Writing is the cornerstone of any scientist’s career. We use writing to communicate our findings and share them with the world. If one doesn’t write and publish in some way, then the data produced isn’t likely to have an impact because it will be difficult or (more likely) impossible to find; therefore all the time spent collecting it will have been worthless. But simply writing down your data doesn’t guarantee a publication. There is an art to composing manuscripts and the ASM Scientific Writing and Publishing Institute (SWPI) is an extremely beneficial guide to becoming a successful writer.

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Topics: Scientific Sharing, Career Readiness

The Blue Flame Award: Celebrating Addgene's Most Requested Depositors

Posted by Jane Hannon on Nov 14, 2016 10:30:00 AM

All plasmids deposited at Addgene enhance scientific sharing worldwide but a select few are particularly special. Over 1000 of our 45,000+ deposited plasmids have been requested more than 100 times each, thereby achieving the coveted “blue flame” status. We’re proud to honor the creativity, passion, and dedication to sharing epitomized by the creators of these plasmids with the first annual Blue Flame Awards.

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Topics: Hot Plasmids, Scientific Sharing, News

Using Video to Share Your Science: We Share Science

Posted by Guest Blogger on Nov 3, 2016 10:30:00 AM

This post was contributed by Ryan Watkins, Professor at George Washington University and developer of wesharescience.org.

Sharing your research with the world can be challenging. After months, or years, of grueling effort to design, fund, and conduct a research project, the vast majority of what gets published in scientific journals flies under the radar and gains little notice. A 2009 research study found that 12% of articles in medicine, 27% in natural sciences, 82% in humanities, and 32% in the social sciences go uncited. Creative titles and controversial topics can garner some attention, though in reality much of our research still fails to reach our primary target audience – colleagues in our field. Secondary audiences that may also benefit, such as researchers in other countries or ot­her disciplines, are even less likely to read about our work. We therefore must discover new ways to reach our colleagues and other interested audiences quickly and concisely – video might be part of the answer.

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Topics: Scientific Sharing, Science Communication

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