Tips for Getting a Faculty Position

Posted by Guest Blogger on May 2, 2017 10:30:00 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger Erik Snapp, Director of Graduate and Postdoctoral Programs at Janelia Research Campus.

Eight years ago, I decided to write a "how to" manual on applying for faculty positions in biomedical science. My motivation was to share my experiences from my own job search and my time on faculty search committees. Having successfully navigated the trials and tribulations of the process, I’ve provided guidance and mentoring to several people that found my insights helpful. All went on to get faculty positions at top state colleges, private universities, and medical schools.

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Topics: Career

March for Science

Posted by Guest Blogger on Apr 21, 2017 10:30:00 AM


This post was contributed by guest blogger, Stephanie Hays, 
a scientist with a passion for photosynthetic communities, microbial interactions, and science education. 

Disclaimer: The views presented in this article are those of the author do not represent a formal stance taken by Addgene or its staff.

In Washington, D.C. as well as sister locations on April 22, 2017, scientists and non-scientists alike will march to advocate for science’s place in education, government, and civilization in general (1).

Science and Politics?

Science is an apolitical process for seeking knowledge. The process begins with a testable hypothesis - an educated guess about how some part of the world functions. Experiments come next, testing the correctness of the hypothesis. The results of experiments can help support or reject a hypothesis. Looking at the data, scientists then revise their hypotheses and the cycle begins again. No part of this process is inherently political so why is there a march in Washington, D.C., the seat of the United States government?

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Topics: Career, News, Science Communication

What Do I Do Now? Academic v. Non-Academic Career Decisions

Posted by Joanne Kamens on Mar 9, 2017 10:40:00 AM

One of the less acknowledged perks of scientific and technical training is that these educational paths prepare you for a vast selection of career options.  Scientists are certainly following many diverse career paths these days.  A recent National Science Foundation study showed that 57% of PhDs in US Biomedical workforce will NOT go into “traditional” academic positions. More recently, I have been hearing exit survey data from postdoctoral programs in the Boston area that demonstrate that 85% of leaving postdocs pursue a career outside the traditional academic silo to tenured professor.  Non-academia encompasses millions of choices including pharma, tech transfer, management consulting, science communication, policy and the diverse options in nonprofit science. No one list can ever encompass them all. We can’t designate non-academic jobs as “alternative” anymore.

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Topics: Career, Career Readiness

Science Career Options

Posted by Emma Markham on Feb 23, 2017 8:30:14 AM



When preparing to graduate from university, many students are confronted with the question ‘what now?’ This is often a hard question to answer if you plan on leaving academia, but don’t quite know what you do want to do or even what careers are available to scientists. It is all too easy to get tunnel vision when working towards a specific goal, and when you realise that your goal might not lead to a career you actually want, you can feel lost. Use this post to explore the wide range of careers available to scientists and open your eyes to the many opportunities available to those who are scientifically minded!

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Topics: Career, Career Readiness

How to Write a Scientific Review Article

Posted by Leila Haery on Feb 16, 2017 10:30:00 AM

Writing a review article is a wonderful way to develop and exercise your scientist skill set. If you dread the thought of writing a review, or if you’re currently stuck trying to write one, hopefully this post will help you get things moving - remember you're becoming an expert in your field and are the perfect person to be writing the review! Doing so is a great way to develop your ability to write, to read efficiently, to search the literature, and to synthesize a large volume of information: basically, a scientist’s tool kit.

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Topics: Career, Career Readiness

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