Plasmids 101: Gateway Cloning

Posted by Maria Soriano on Jan 12, 2017 10:30:00 AM

When facing a cloning project, scientists are no longer limited to traditional restriction enzyme cloning. Instead, you can choose a molecular cloning technique that will work well with a given set of resources, time, and experimental needs. Since its invention in the late 1990s, Gateway cloning technology has become very popular as a rapid and highly efficient way to move DNA sequences into multiple vector systems. With the appropriate entry and destination vectors, one can use Gateway to clone a gene of interest into a variety of expression systems. Keep reading to learn more about the Gateway cloning method and its advantages.

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Topics: Plasmids 101, Plasmid Cloning

Uncertainty about Labor Law Brings More Uncertainty to Postdoc Wages

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jan 11, 2017 10:30:00 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger, Gary McDowell, executive director of Future of Research.

On December 1st 2016, many postdocs working more than 40 hours per week could expect to see their salary raised to at least a new legal minimum of $47,476 per year, under updates to the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). This was due to the threshold at which salaried workers receive overtime payment for working more than 40 hours per week increasing from $23,660 to $47,476 per year. This post discusses how a nationwide injunction against the FLSA is affecting universities' decisions to alter postdoc salaries - in some cases reversing these decisions entirely.

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Topics: Career

Truncated gRNAs for Regulating Gene Expression

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jan 10, 2017 10:37:46 AM

This post was contributed by guest bloggers Alissa Lance-Byrne and Alex Chavez, researchers at the Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering.

CRISPR/Cas9 technology has revolutionized the fields of molecular biology and bioengineering, as it has facilitated the development of a simple and scalable means of making targeted genetic edits. Cas9 is a DNA binding protein that can be directed to virtually any genetic locus when complexed with an appropriately designed small RNA, or guide RNA (gRNA). The gRNA conventionally contains a 20-nucleotide sequence that is complementary to the target site, or protospacer, in the genome. Native Cas9 has two catalytic domains, each of which cleaves one strand of DNA upon binding the protospacer. The resulting double strand break (DSB) stimulates DNA repair mechanisms that can be exploited to either inactivate a gene or introduce a desired genetic alteration.

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Topics: CRISPR

Top Requested Lentivirus and AAV of 2016

Posted by Leila Haery on Jan 6, 2017 10:56:47 AM

In July 2016, we launched our Viral Service and began delivering ready-to-use lentivirus and adeno-associated virus (AAV) to scientists around the world. We began with only a few inventory items offered domestically, but by the end of 2016, we expanded our viral inventory to 25 lentiviruses and 25 AAVs. These viruses have been distributed in over 200 packages to more than 20 countries. With this initial success, we will continue to provide and expand this diverse and useful collection of tools so that researchers around the world can accelerate their work. After all, as we like to sayat Addgene, productivity is infectious.

Curious which viruses researchers have found the most useful so far? We crunched the numbers on our Viral Service (and then we crunched them again) to find the most requested lentivirus and AAV of 2016.

The top viruses of 2016 were (drumroll please)...

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Topics: Fun, News, Viral Vectors

Michael Davidson and Roger Tsien Commemorative Travel Awards

Posted by Tyler Ford on Jan 5, 2017 10:55:23 AM

To commemorate their innumerable contributions to the development and use of fluorescent protein tools and their dedication to scientific sharing, Addgene is opening applications for the Michael Davidson and Roger Tsien Commemorative Travel Awards. These $2,000 USD awards will be open to any masters students, PhD students, or postdocs traveling to an academic conference in 2017 who can demonstrate that fluorescent proteins have or will have an impact on their research.

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Topics: Fluorescent Proteins

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