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AAV Titers: Where do they come from and what do they mean?

Posted by Leila Haery on Nov 15, 2017 10:00:00 AM

Remember the game show “The $25,000 Pyramid” where one player tries to get the other to guess a category by listing off things that fall into that category? Okay, let’s play! I’ll list the examples and you try to guess the category:

ELISA...
qPCR...
Digital droplet PCR...
DNA dot blot...
Transduction assay...
SDS-PAGE...
Electron microscopy…

Any guesses?

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Topics: Viral Vectors

Transferable Skills Guide: Career Planning Resources

Posted by Michael G. Lemieux on Nov 14, 2017 9:00:00 AM

recent survey of PhDs found that many researchers feel that they lack formal training in a variety of transferable skills. At Addgene we've set out to fill this gap by both highlighting that researchers do learn MANY transferable skills while working in the lab and by offering advice on areas where you might need some help. Today: Career Planning Resources.

The key to ensuring success during graduate school and beyond is to live in your lab, right? Wrong! While it is clearly a good idea to be diligent in your research, remember that you will not be a graduate student or postdoc forever, and you need to be thinking about what comes next. To that end, one of the most important things that you can do now is diversify. Read on for an overview of some of the resources you can use to better prepare for your career, and increase your chances of landing that next coveted job!

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Topics: Career, Career Readiness, Transferable Skills Guide

Career Insights: Technical Support Specialist

Posted by Klaus Wanisch on Nov 9, 2017 9:00:00 AM

A degree in the life sciences prepares one for numerous non-academic careers. Still, many start their scientific careers hoping to follow the traditional academic route (find tips for getting a faculty position here). Possible roadblocks only become obvious at rather late stages (i.e. postdoc level) and can include the pressure to publish in high-impact journals, and the requirement for a high grant success rate. At this point, candidates are highly experienced but often have to start pursuing other options.

While some non-academic career options require additional study for late career scientists to become more appealing on the job market (e.g. a postgraduate degree in law, an MBA, or similar), there are many roles out there that require exactly what life science PhDs can offer: vast practical lab expertise, experience in different scientific fields, and knowledge of how to troubleshoot problems at the bench. Specifically, roles in technical support make excellent use of the skills developed by life science PhDs.

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Topics: Career, Career Readiness

Adeno Associated Virus (AAV) for Cell and Gene Therapy

Posted by Guest Blogger on Nov 7, 2017 8:59:12 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger Harshana S De Silva Feelixge.

Subscribe to Viral Vectors Blog Posts

Gene therapy technologies hold great promise for improving or potentially curing human diseases that were previously thought to be incurable. Rapid advances in next generation sequencing technologies have allowed scientists to quickly identify underlying genetic causes of some human conditions, opening up new avenues for therapeutics that treat disease at the molecular level. For instance, if a disease is caused by a mutation in a single gene, it can potentially be treated by correcting the mutation or replacing the gene. A notable example is the treatment of Severe Combined Immune Deficiency disease (SCID-XI), also known as bubble boy syndrome. This disease is caused by mutations in the common cytokine receptor gamma chain (c) and is characterized by a lack of immune cell development and function. To date, gene therapy has been used to treat 10 infants with this disease. To do so, their T-cells were grown in vitro, their mutations corrected, and the T-cells were transferred back into the infants. Almost all patients have achieved persistent immunological reconstitution with a normally functioning T cell repertoire (1).

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Topics: Viral Vectors

Cultivating Community Science at BosLab

Posted by Guest Blogger on Nov 2, 2017 9:35:33 AM

This guest post was contributed by Angela Kaczmarczyk, co-organizer at BosLab.

Biotechnology is no longer just for those working in academia or industry. At BosLab, we identify ourselves as part of a network of independent Do-it-Yourself (DIY) biology laboratories working towards enabling everyone to participate in the biotech revolution. Our lab exists in what appears to be a funky old garage, but looks can be deceiving. Step into this building and you will find a bike kitchen on the first floor and upstairs you will find our fully-equipped laboratory for citizen scientists. In addition to maintaining a laboratory to support both individual and community science projects, we offer classes, workshops, book clubs, seminars, and social events.

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Topics: Scientific Sharing

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