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DIY DNA Ladders from Penn State University

Posted by Beth Kenkel on Jul 14, 2017 10:30:00 AM

Two plasmids that can be used to make inexpensive 100 bp or 1 kb DNA molecular weight ladders were recently deposited with Addgene. A team of undergraduate students led by Dr. Song Tan at Penn State developed the plasmids, pPSU1 and pPSU2. When restriction digested with PstI or EcoRV, these plasmids generate 100 bp or 1 kb DNA ladders, respectively. Unlike many commercially available ladders, the 100 bp ladder works well for both agarose and native polyacrylamide gels.

Get Tips on Verifying Your Plasmid

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Topics: Hot Plasmids, Lab Tips

Quick Guide to Working with Drosophila Part 1: Getting Started with Flies

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jul 13, 2017 10:30:00 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger Jon Chow, an immunology PhD student at Harvard University.

Do you have a gene of interest but have run into a wall trying to study it? It happens. Is it an evolutionarily conserved gene? Can you find an ortholog in the Drosophila genome? Continue reading and I’ll show you how Drosophila can be used to push your research in new and exciting directions.

Drosophila are very easy to manipulate genetically and have limited genetic redundancy (meaning, there’s more of a chance of seeing a phenotype since additional genes that can do the same function are less likely to exist). If there’s an ortholog of your favorite gene (YFG) in Drosophila (and even if there’s not!) the wealth of Drosophila genetic tools available allow you to study many aspects of your gene’s functional biology in a living organism. This is the first post in a three-part series. We’ll first discuss how to get started on fly work in this post. The second post will detail a major tool used by Drosophila geneticists (the Gal4/UAS system), and the third post will describe how you can make your own mutant flies.

Find Drosophila Resources at Addgene

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Topics: Lab Tips, Drosophila, Quick Guide to Drosophila

How to Design Your gRNA for CRISPR Genome Editing

Posted by Guest Blogger on May 3, 2017 11:00:00 AM

This Post was updated on May 3, 2017 with additional information and resources. 

This post was contributed by guest blogger, Addgene Advisory Board member, and Associate Director of the Genetic Perturbation Platform at the Broad Institute, John Doench.

CRISPR technology has made it easier than ever both to engineer specific DNA edits and to perform functional screens to identify genes involved in a phenotype of interest. This blog post will discuss differences between these approaches, as well as provide updates on how best to design gRNAs. You can also find validated gRNAs for your next experiment in Addgene's Validated gRNA Sequence Datatable.

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Topics: Plasmid How To, Genome Engineering, Lab Tips, CRISPR

Editor's Choice, September 2016

Posted by Tyler Ford on Oct 7, 2016 12:00:00 PM

Read All of Our Editor's Choice Blog Posts

As I’m sitting in the San Francisco International Airport listening to the Lion King soundtrack and writing this post, it is my pleasure to announce that we once again reached new heights on the Addgene blog: we surpassed 60,000 views for the month of September! Historically we do better in September than in the summer months, but this is also our best month ever! Hats off to all of our wonderful writers and all those who have helped edit over the past couple of months. Read on to discover what new post contributed the most to this record breaking month and to find other posts that deserve a second look.

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Topics: Lab Tips, Techniques, Editor's Choice

5 Great Apps for Lab Life

Posted by Guest Blogger on Sep 22, 2016 10:30:00 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger Sean D. Stacey. Opinions on the apps discussed in the article are those of the guest blogger and do not necessarily represent the views of Addgene.

I think it’s safe to assume that anyone reading this article has a smartphone nearby. We tailor these devices to our own interests with the content we store in them: music, emails, chats, pictures, and apps. Throughout my time as a graduate student, I have relied more and more heavily on adapting my smartphone to help me with my research in terms of preparedness, organization, and sharing data. Here are five FREE science lab apps that have been educational and great for lab life. These apps prevent you from constantly searching the interwebs for lab resources, and instead conveniently provide them on your smart phone.

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Topics: Lab Tips

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