Latest Posts

All Posts

Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jul 16, 2015 10:30:00 AM

This post was contributed by Jae Lee and Pantelis Tsoulfas of the Department of Neurological Surgery at the University of Miami.

The beginning of this century has seen some major advances in light microscopy, particularly related to the neurosciences.  These developments in microscopy coupled with techniques that make tissues transparent are enabling microscopes to visualize the cellular architecture of whole tissues in 3D with unprecedented detail.  One of these advances in microscopy has been light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM). The underlying method was developed in 1902 by Richard Zsigmondy and Henry Siedentopf to enhance the microscopic resolution for studying colloidal gold (1).  The method was based on using a thin plane (sheet) of light generated by sunlight to observe single gold particles with diameters less than 4nm.

Read More >

Topics: Imaging, Fluorescent Proteins

Tips for Using FRET in Your Experiments

Posted by Benoit Giquel on Nov 5, 2014 10:41:00 AM

The first time I heard about FRET during a journal club, my guitarist brain automatically thought about the raised element found on the neck of my guitar...not really useful for a biologist you would say. The student was of course talking about the now well-known FRET, aka Fluorescence (Förster) Resonance Energy Transfer, technique which allows the detection of molecules' interactions, modifications or dissociations in situ. Used since the mid-90s, this technique has revolutionised the way we apprehend molecular complexes and is still a very useful tool.   

Like a guitar hero (that I’m not), FRET loves playing “live”. Indeed, FRET was one of the first techniques which enabled the measurement of single molecule interactions in living cells using a microscope. Historically, molecular interactions were detected by indirect means often using probes with the potential to target several molecules. By analogy, it was like pointing out a group of students in a university hall but not knowing if these students know or interact with each other. FRET reduced the scale of our perception about molecular interactions.

Read More >

Topics: Imaging, Fluorescent Proteins

In Living Color: The Skinny on In Vivo Imaging Tools

Posted by Kendall Morgan on Mar 27, 2014 1:14:57 PM

If you start poking around on Addgene’s Fluorescent Protein Guide to In Vivo Imaging, you’ll pretty quickly notice the name Vladislav Verkhusha popping up again and again, and for good reason.

We all know scientists have used fluorescent proteins to observe what’s happening inside cells for at least a couple of decades. Green is the classic color, but fluorescent proteins are available in a variety of hues. While those tools are great for many applications, Verkhusha and his lab at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York recognized their limitations for peering right through living animals to see their organs – a liver or brain, say, or maybe a tumor. They wanted to find something better.

Read More >

Topics: Plasmid Technology, Hot Plasmids, Imaging

Click here to subscribe to the Addgene Blog
 
Subscribe