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Transferable Skills Guide: Managing a Team

Posted by Karen Guerin on Jan 30, 2018 9:42:28 AM

A recent survey of PhDs found that many researchers feel that they lack formal training in a variety of transferable skills. At Addgene we've set out to fill this gap by both highlighting that researchers do learn MANY transferable skills while working in the lab and by offering advice on areas where you might need some help. Today in our transferable skills guide: managing a team.

You’ve just been promoted, congratulations! You’re now a manager with your own team! But what does it really mean to manage a team?

If your graduate school experience was anything like mine you didn’t think much about management skills during your scientific training. I never thought about management skills before being propelled into the position of manager. I barely had any experience being managed! The good news is that management skills can be taught, but it will take time so be patient and keep an open mind.

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Topics: Transferable Skills Guide, Management for Scientists, Career, Career Readiness

Transferable Skills Guide: Identifying Your Transferable Skills

Posted by Kayla Strickland on Jan 11, 2018 10:29:18 AM

What is a transferable skill?

Time management. I needed it when balancing a handful of demanding courses, a capstone paper I really wanted to hit out of the park, part time work, bills, (at times) a social life and rest. I need it just as much in my current role as Customer Support and Operations Manager at Addgene. In this role, I balance my daily tasks, meet cross-team project commitments, respond to any issues raised by team members, and plan for the future of the team. All while still paying bills and having a life outside my job.

The same can be said about teamwork, communication, writing, management, and creativity; I have developed these skills through school, jobs, and volunteer work, and I guarantee you have developed them through similar experiences in graduate school. These skills will be useful anywhere I work in the future; they are transferrable across most, if not all, industries and work environments. This is why they are called transferable skills.

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Topics: Career, Transferable Skills Guide

Advice on Career Paths and the Green Card Process for International Researchers and Entrepreneurs

Posted by Guest Blogger on Dec 20, 2017 9:33:58 AM

This post was contributed by guest bloggers Lauren Celano of Propel Careers and Rachel Casseus, Esq. Founder of Casseus Law.

Disclaimer: The contents of this post are intended to convey general information only and not to provide legal advice or opinions. The contents of this post should not be relied upon for legal advice in any particular circumstance or fact situation.  The information presented may not reflect the most current legal developments.  Further, this post may contain technical inaccuracies or typographical errors.  No action should be taken in reliance on the information contained in this post and we disclaim all liability in respect to actions taken or not taken based on any or all the contents of this post.  An attorney should be contacted for advice on specific legal issues. 

The permanent residence “green card” process is a necessary and often overlooked part of career development for foreign national researchers and entrepreneurs who are looking to continue their careers in the United States. There has been a growing shift away from employers sponsoring individuals for green cards because of the cost, long timeline and uncertainty associated with filing a permanent residence case with United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). If it were up to us, we would give everyone with a Ph.D. a green card, but until we get elected to Congress, we are tasked with working with US immigration in its current state. As of September 2017, USCIS received 116,224 employment based green card applications and approved 91,023 during the first 3 quarters of 2017. As an international researcher and aspiring entrepreneur, you have many career options available to you including careers in academia, industry, non-profit, and government sectors.  Within these sectors, you could start your own company, work in a bench research career or a non-bench research career such as law, medical/technical writing, clinical, regulatory, product development, business development, consulting, policy, big data and the list goes on and on.

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Topics: Career

Transferable Skills Guide: Time Management

Posted by Tyler Ford on Dec 5, 2017 8:52:56 AM

A recent survey of PhDs found that many researchers feel that they lack formal training in a variety of transferable skills. At Addgene we've set out to fill this gap by both highlighting that researchers do learn MANY transferable skills while working in the lab and by offering advice on areas where you might need some help. Today in our transferable skills guide: Time Mangement for Scientists.

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Topics: Career Readiness, Career, Transferable Skills Guide

Transferable Skills Guide: Teamwork

Posted by Eric J. Perkins on Nov 28, 2017 9:00:00 AM

recent survey of PhDs found that many researchers feel that they lack formal training in a variety of transferable skills. At Addgene we've set out to fill this gap by both highlighting that researchers do learn MANY transferable skills while working in the lab and by offering advice on areas where you might need some help. Today: Teamwork.

My first experience on a successful scientific team came as an undergrad at Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Though some WPI students chose to go the solo route for their Major Qualifying Project (or MQP, the school’s equivalent of a senior thesis), I knew early on that I wanted to work with a partner. WPI’s emphasis on teamwork was what drew me to the school in the first place. The famous discoveries and experiments I’d been learning about for years were usually the products of teams: Watson, Crick, & Franklin, Meselson-Stahl, Hershey-Chase...Who was I to dispute history? And boy did I make the right decision. If I’d spent my senior year isolating pheromones from various C. elegans mutants by myself, I would have slowly gone crazy. As it was, my partner Mike and I split the work, shared the credit, and we both won accolades that would launch our careers in science.

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Topics: Career Readiness, Career, Transferable Skills Guide

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