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Tyler Ford

Tyler J. Ford is an Outreach Scientist at Addgene. His professional duties include helping maintain the Addgene blog (blog.addgene.org), talking to people about Addgene, and improving Addgene's services. His non-professional duties include running, biking, drawing, hiking, playing tennis, reading, and writing.
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Recent Posts

Call for Guest Bloggers

Posted by Tyler Ford on Mar 2, 2016 10:00:00 AM

Whenever possible, we love to give scientists the opportunity to share their knowledge. One of our goals is to be a go-to source of information on recent advances in the biological sciences and techniques that simplify and expedite research. We recognize, however, that we can’t do it all ourselves. Therefore, in this blog post we’re taking a moment to reach out to you, our readers, and ask you to share your expertise through our blog.

Do you have skill in a particular technique? Do you have a set of tips you give to every new lab mate? Do you have a trick to get the highest yield out of your minipreps? If so, we’d love to have you write for us!

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Topics: Career, Inside Addgene

Plasmids 101: Restriction Cloning

Posted by Tyler Ford on Feb 18, 2016 10:42:06 AM

When cloning by restriction digest and ligation, you use restriction enzymes to cut open a plasmid (backbone) and insert a linear fragment of DNA (insert) that has been cut by compatible restriction enzymes. An enzyme, DNA ligase, then covalently binds the plasmid to the new fragment thereby generating a complete, circular plasmid that can be easily maintained in a variety of biological systems. Read on for an in-depth breakdown of how to do perform restriction digests.

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Topics: Plasmids 101, Protocols, Plasmid Cloning

Michael Koeris' Journey from Grad Student to Entrepreneur: The Story of Sample 6

Posted by Tyler Ford on Jan 21, 2016 11:52:39 AM

In the third installment in our podcast series, we chat with new Addgene Board Member, Michael Koeris. Dr. Koeris did his graduate work in Professor Jim Collins' lab (then at Boston University, now at MIT) where he worked on understanding bacterial antibiotic resistance. During this time, Dr. Koeris and Professor Timothy Lu (a graduate student in the Collins' lab at the time) got the idea to engineer bacteriophage (viruses that infect bacteria) for use as antibiotics. To develop this idea, Drs. Koeris and Lu founded the biotech startup company, Novophage. As you'll hear Dr. Koeris explain however, the time was not right for the development of phage-based therapeutics. After a brief stint at the venture capital firm, Flagship Ventures, Koeris helped change Novophage's focus. The company went from developing therapeutics to developing phage-based tools for detecting pathogens in food products. Along the way, the company changed its name from Novophage to Sample 6.

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Topics: Career, Interview, Career Readiness, Podcast

How to Deposit Your Plasmids with Addgene

Posted by Tyler Ford on Jan 5, 2016 10:30:00 AM

At Addgene, it is our mission to make it easy for you to share plasmids. To achieve this goal, we will archive any plasmids you've deposited with us and distribute them to scientists at academic and non profit institutions worldwide. What's more, depositing is free! When we travel to talk to scientists about how we can help them share plasmids, we get many questions about how the deposit process works. To make things a little easier for you, we've written this post as a step-by-step guide to the online deposit process.

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Topics: Inside Addgene

Your Top Requested Plasmid in 2015!

Posted by Tyler Ford on Dec 30, 2015 10:30:00 AM

We’ve dug into the data from our repository to find our most requested plasmid in 2015. In line with all of the exciting developments surrounding CRISPR genome engineering in the past year, we're excited to announce that the plasmid most requested from the Addgene repository in 2015 was...

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Topics: Fun, Inside Addgene, CRISPR, pooled libraries

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