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Using Virus in Your Research - A Primer for Beginners

Posted by Leila Haery on Jun 7, 2016 11:09:27 AM


We’ve all had the feeling where it seems like we’re the only one in the room who doesn’t know about an important scientific principle.

Example Scenario

Important science person: ...and then we found out that it wasn’t a deoxynucleotide, it was a dideoxynucleotide!

Room full of important science people: (laughter in unison)

You: (nervous laughter)

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Topics: Viral Vectors

Lentiviral Vector Uses and Overview

Posted by Mary Gearing on May 19, 2016 10:30:00 AM


Lentiviral vectors
are one of the most popular and useful viral vectors in the lab. Advantages of lentivirus include a large genetic capacity and the ability to transduce both dividing and non-dividing cells. Lentiviral vectors are the vector of choice for many CRISPR applications, and they’ve also had success in clinical gene therapy applications. Read on to learn more about the current (and future) applications of lentiviral vectors!

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Topics: Viral Vectors

Getting the Most from Your Lentiviral Transduction

Posted by Meghan Rego on Apr 7, 2016 10:30:00 AM

Lentiviruses are a powerful laboratory tool often employed to establish cell lines that stably express a gene of interest. While the general approach for using lentivirus, infect and select, seems simple, in actuality, many find using lentivirus to be time consuming, difficult, and lacking in reproducibility. Read on for some tips for getting the most out of your lentiviral transduction experiments.

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Topics: Lab Tips, Viral Vectors

Minigenomes - a Safe Way to Study Dangerous Viruses

Posted by Guest Blogger on Mar 17, 2016 10:30:00 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger Tessa Cressey.

The highly pathogenic Ebola virus belongs to the group of nonsegmented negative sense RNA viruses, along with other viruses that cause disease in humans such as measles, mumps, and rabies. Research on Ebola virus has been limited, in part, due to the necessity for working with this virus under the highest biosafety level conditions, BSL-4. In this regard, minigenome systems, such as the one developed for Zaire ebolavirus (EBOV) are extremely useful, allowing researchers to study aspects of the EBOV replication cycle under BSL-2 conditions (4).

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Topics: Viral Vectors

Tips for Titering Your Lentiviral Preps

Posted by Meghan Rego on Mar 15, 2016 10:30:00 AM


The day has arrived; you’ve painstakingly cared for your packaging cell line, prepped your DNA, transfected and harvested your lentivirus. Now it’s time to move ahead with your infection and make your stable cell line. While we’ve all experienced the pressure to move a project forward, transductions should not be rushed into. Before you start any transduction, you should always titer your virus - that is determine the amount of virus you actually have in your prep. Taking time to properly titer your virus will not only ensure that your infection is designed in the best possible way but it may also save you time in the long run. Read on for an overview of the titering options and the benefits and drawbacks of different methods (for comprehensive protocols for all of the methods discussed here refer to
Kutner et. al.).

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Topics: Techniques, Viral Vectors

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