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Top Requested Lentivirus and AAV of 2016

Posted by Leila Haery on Jan 6, 2017 10:56:47 AM

In July 2016, we launched our Viral Service and began delivering ready-to-use lentivirus and adeno-associated virus (AAV) to scientists around the world. We began with only a few inventory items offered domestically, but by the end of 2016, we expanded our viral inventory to 25 lentiviruses and 25 AAVs. These viruses have been distributed in over 200 packages to more than 20 countries. With this initial success, we will continue to provide and expand this diverse and useful collection of tools so that researchers around the world can accelerate their work. After all, as we like to sayat Addgene, productivity is infectious.

Curious which viruses researchers have found the most useful so far? We crunched the numbers on our Viral Service (and then we crunched them again) to find the most requested lentivirus and AAV of 2016.

The top viruses of 2016 were (drumroll please)...

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Topics: Fun, News, Viral Vectors

With Our New Viral Service, We're Taking CRISPR Further!

Posted by Tyler Ford on Dec 6, 2016 10:30:00 AM

Numbers in the large colored circles are rough approximations of the total number of CRISPR plasmids for that particular organism available at Addgene. Percentages represent the fraction of that total with the indicated function.

One huge reason CRISPR has become such a popular genome editing tool is its developers’ willingness to make their CRISPR technologies available to the academic research community. At Addgene, we’ve helped distribute many of these technologies in plasmid form and are proud to have facilitated their fast adoption. However, in many cases the plasmids themselves are only the starting point for the production of viruses used to deliver CRISPR components to cells or organisms under study. In the past we’ve left the arduous task of virus production to individual labs, but now we’re very excited to provide ready-to-use CRISPR lentiviral preps to researchers across the globe.

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Topics: CRISPR, Viral Vectors

Using Addgene's New Viral Service for Your Research

Posted by Tyler Ford on Nov 17, 2016 10:30:00 AM


Instead of spending time and money producing virus from select vectors in the repository yourself, you can now order ready-to-use virus directly from Addgene! As part of our new Viral Service, we’re distributing lentivirus (with many CRISPR tools included among the preps that are currently available) and adeno associated virus (AAV, primarily chemogenetics tools for now but with optogenetic tools coming soon). The viral preparations undergo rigorous quality control testing at Addgene meaning they come ready made to accelerate your research.

 

Need Virus? Check out Addgene's New Viral Service!

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Topics: Inside Addgene, News, Viral Vectors

5 Tips for Troubleshooting Viral Transductions

Posted by Leila Haery on Aug 11, 2016 10:23:59 AM

An estimated 320,000 viruses can infect mammals. Even more abundant are the Earth’s estimated 1031 bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria), many of which are doing important work in our microbiomes. Given that viruses are everywhere and doing everything, it can be annoying when we try to use them in an experiment and they don't do anything.

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Topics: Viral Vectors

AAV: A Versatile Viral Tool for Gene Expression in Mammals

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jul 26, 2016 10:30:00 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger Didem Goz Ayturk, a Postdoctoral Fellow in Connie Cepko’s Lab at Harvard Medical School with edits from Addgenie Karen Guerin.

Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has emerged as a favorite viral tool for both research and clinical applications. AAV can be used to transiently express a gene of interest in a variety of cell types. It was first described about 50 years ago as a contaminant of adenoviral preparations, hence the name (Atchison et al., 1965) AAV is a single stranded, DNA virus belonging to the family Parvoviridae. It has a "simple" genome packaged in an icosahedral capsid. It does not have a lipid coat, also called an envelope, and thus cannot support the addition of a glycoprotein, such as VSV-G, to its surface. In research applications, the genome is typically gutted so that precious cargo space is opened for gene delivery, and for safety. You can easily complement the virus in a tissue culture setting, in other words “in trans”, by supplying the genes that encode the replicase functions and capsid proteins. This gives researchers the ability to produce more virus in a controlled setting. Even though AAV is isolated from a wide range of organisms, it has not been associated with disease, and it is considered a biosafety level 1 (BSL1) viral agent.

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Topics: Viral Vectors

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