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6 Tools & Tips: Online Social Networking for Scientists

Posted by Kendall Morgan on May 19, 2015 8:17:00 AM

 

As Joanne Kamens has pointed out, there’s surely no better place for scientists to meet and mingle with other scientists than at a conference. But in this increasingly wired world, more and more of our day-to-day personal interactions are taking place online. And if findings from network science apply to scientists, then building and maintaining an open social network is key when it comes to career success. In this enterprise, more scientists are finding online tools to be instrumental. At Addgene, we're all about helping develop a scientific community, so here are some tips to help you get more involved with your scientific network online.

As Holly Bik and Miriam Goldstein wrote in their PLoS Biology paper, “In the age of the internet, social media tools offer a powerful way for scientists to boost their professional profile and act as a public voice for science.” In “An Introduction to Social Media For Scientists,” Bik and Goldstein offer many tips on how to take advantage of mainstream social media. The article focuses on some of the popular social media tools available and the potential benefits that can be reaped from using these tools.

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Topics: Scientific Sharing, Science Communication, Networking

Writing Scientific Manuscripts: Literature Searching, Reading, & Organizing

Posted by Guest Blogger on May 5, 2015 11:54:00 AM

This post was contributed by Johnna Roose. This post was originally published on Johnna's New Under The Sun Blog and is part of her larger tutorial series, A Beginner’s Guide to Writing Scientific Manuscripts.

Any scientific manuscript will require numerous other references to scientific literature to substantiate the facts upon which it builds. This means you have to become familiar with a body of literature related to the topic. Finding reliable references and sorting out what they mean is no small task. As a scientist, it is useful to make literature searching and reading a regular part of your routine. Set a goal to read a certain number of papers each week to keep up with the research in your area. When you are in ‘writing-mode’ for a grant or a scientific manuscript, the reading will likely be more intense, but it is a general good practice to keep up with the scientific literature a little bit at a time.

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Topics: Career, Science Communication

Resume Writing for Non-academic Science Careers

Posted by Guest Blogger on Dec 18, 2014 11:06:00 AM

This post was contributed by Theresa Liao of the University of British Columbia.

When transitioning from an academic science career path to a non-academic one, one of the biggest changes (and perhaps challenges) is the need to present yourself using a resume. Indeed, instead of having all the pages in a Curricula Vitae to showcase your publications, academic performances, and research experiences, you now have merely two pages to convince your potential employer that you are the right candidate for the job.

How can you incorporate the skills developed during graduate school into your resume? How can you stand out among all the candidates applying for the position?

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Topics: Career, Science Communication, Career Readiness

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