Latest Posts

All Posts

Savvy Advocates Needed to Navigate a Scientific Enterprise in Flux

Posted by Guest Blogger on Sep 13, 2016 10:30:00 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger, David T. Riglar

Advocating for Science Symposium and Workshop 2016 – Sept 16-17 MIT, Boston

The Advocating for Science Symposium and Workshop, organized by Future of Research, Academics for the Future of Science, and the MIT Graduate Student Council will be held on Friday 16th and Saturday 17th September respectively. Join us to discuss advocacy efforts toward positive change in the scientific enterprise and the way it is funded and to learn tangible skills necessary for affecting change. On Friday, the symposium includes a panel discussion and keynote by former congressman and CEO of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, Rush Holt, followed by a networking reception. Saturday’s workshop will be an advocacy skills “bootcamp” for a focused group of participants. More information can be found at http://futureofresearch.org/advocating-for-science-boston-2016/.

Read More >

Topics: Career, Science Communication, Career Readiness, Mentoring for Scientists

10 Steps to a Perfect Science Talk

Posted by Joanne Kamens on Aug 23, 2016 10:30:00 AM

Like graphing data, choosing controls, or mixing clear solutions—public speaking is skill that any scientist can learn.  Any time you give a science talk, you are also giving a job talk. Even if not being interviewed, there could always be a future boss in the room, so it is a good idea to start thinking about public speaking early and often. Two of my jobs have indirectly resulted from someone seeing me speak in a non-interview setting. There are many resources on self-promotion (how hard it is for some people, especially women), visibility (how to get it, especially if introverted ), and networking (how to get people to remember you). What better way to accomplish all of these things naturally than to give a dynamite presentation?  To that end, let’s chat about giving science talks and how to make them serve you well. The happy byproduct might just be a career opportunity.

Check out Joanne's Reddit AMA

Read More >

Topics: Career, Science Communication, Career Readiness

Science Communication Snapshot: DayCon 2015

Posted by Mary Gearing on Jun 17, 2015 5:04:11 PM


SITN DayCon 2015 Team

Here at Addgene, we’re dedicated to advancing and sharing science! In association with the Harvard graduate student organization Science in the News (SITN), we recently sponsored a first-time event called DayCon. DayCon is a one-day conference aimed at the general public that provides an accessible introduction to various scientific topics. Over twenty graduate student volunteers worked hard to make this Saturday event a success, a true testament to the commitment of SITN members.

Read More >

Topics: Scientific Sharing, Science Communication

6 Tools & Tips: Online Social Networking for Scientists

Posted by Kendall Morgan on May 19, 2015 8:17:00 AM

 

As Joanne Kamens has pointed out, there’s surely no better place for scientists to meet and mingle with other scientists than at a conference. But in this increasingly wired world, more and more of our day-to-day personal interactions are taking place online. And if findings from network science apply to scientists, then building and maintaining an open social network is key when it comes to career success. In this enterprise, more scientists are finding online tools to be instrumental. At Addgene, we're all about helping develop a scientific community, so here are some tips to help you get more involved with your scientific network online.

As Holly Bik and Miriam Goldstein wrote in their PLoS Biology paper, “In the age of the internet, social media tools offer a powerful way for scientists to boost their professional profile and act as a public voice for science.” In “An Introduction to Social Media For Scientists,” Bik and Goldstein offer many tips on how to take advantage of mainstream social media. The article focuses on some of the popular social media tools available and the potential benefits that can be reaped from using these tools.

Read More >

Topics: Scientific Sharing, Science Communication, Networking

Writing Scientific Manuscripts: Literature Searching, Reading, & Organizing

Posted by Guest Blogger on May 5, 2015 11:54:00 AM

This post was contributed by Johnna Roose. This post was originally published on Johnna's New Under The Sun Blog and is part of her larger tutorial series, A Beginner’s Guide to Writing Scientific Manuscripts.

Any scientific manuscript will require numerous other references to scientific literature to substantiate the facts upon which it builds. This means you have to become familiar with a body of literature related to the topic. Finding reliable references and sorting out what they mean is no small task. As a scientist, it is useful to make literature searching and reading a regular part of your routine. Set a goal to read a certain number of papers each week to keep up with the research in your area. When you are in ‘writing-mode’ for a grant or a scientific manuscript, the reading will likely be more intense, but it is a general good practice to keep up with the scientific literature a little bit at a time.

Read More >

Topics: Career, Science Communication

Blog Logo Vertical-01.png

Subscribe to Our Blog