6 Tools & Tips: Online Social Networking for Scientists

Posted by Kendall Morgan on May 19, 2015 8:17:00 AM

 

As Joanne Kamens has pointed out, there’s surely no better place for scientists to meet and mingle with other scientists than at a conference. But in this increasingly wired world, more and more of our day-to-day personal interactions are taking place online. And if findings from network science apply to scientists, then building and maintaining an open social network is key when it comes to career success. In this enterprise, more scientists are finding online tools to be instrumental. At Addgene, we're all about helping develop a scientific community, so here are some tips to help you get more involved with your scientific network online.

As Holly Bik and Miriam Goldstein wrote in their PLoS Biology paper, “In the age of the internet, social media tools offer a powerful way for scientists to boost their professional profile and act as a public voice for science.” In “An Introduction to Social Media For Scientists,” Bik and Goldstein offer many tips on how to take advantage of mainstream social media. The article focuses on some of the popular social media tools available and the potential benefits that can be reaped from using these tools.

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Topics: Scientific Sharing, Science Communication, Networking

How to Make Friends and Meet People at a Scientific Conference

Posted by Joanne Kamens on Aug 7, 2014 9:58:00 AM

There is essentially no better place for a scientist to make new relationships than at scientific conferences. Conferences provide the opportunity to meet people who are interested in the same things you are on a deep level. Right away you have something in common. Namely, the scientific question you are interested in and this is a great ice breaker. Of course, real relationships go further and grow over time, but being interested in the same phosphate of your favorite kinase is a good start.

Check out Joanne's Reddit AMA

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Topics: Career, Networking

Scientist Networking: What is an Informational Interview?

Posted by Joanne Kamens on Jul 1, 2014 11:42:00 AM

Training as a scientist in the academic system has many pluses. I delighted in my graduate school years for allowing me to focus wholly on the science I love. This immersive nature of academia often means that scientists-in-training rarely get the opportunity to learn about the myriad of diverse, nonacademic careers that will be available once they have a graduate degree in science. I find it ironic that we do all of our training as scientists (5-12 years worth!) with academic scientists who can’t help us learn about the nonacademic sphere where most of us will be working

Check out Joanne's Reddit AMA

It should be no secret that one of the best things you can do during your training is meet interesting people doing interesting things. I call this building relationships because networking has gotten a bad reputation (as in…”I just hate networking”). Scientists enjoy learning new things. Building new relationships is all about learning new things from other scientists doing interesting work. Consider this to be like any other research project. You’ve met someone whose career interests you or you want to pursue someone doing a job you wish you knew more about – how do you make a connection? An Informational Interview is a great next step in your research.

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Topics: Career, Networking

10 Ways to Share Your Science!

Posted by Kendall Morgan on May 13, 2014 4:34:00 PM

You've heard it before  it's important for scientists to get out there and talk about their work. To tell others why that work is cool and why it really matters! There are important societal reasons, self-interested reasons, and, given that science is largely funded by tax-payers, there are reasons to feel obligated too, as experts on the subject brought out in a Kavli Foundation Round Table.

In any field, good communication skills help when it comes to finding a job. Many people in science will work in industry or take on collaborative roles in academia, and that means it’s important to know how to talk about science to everyone – not just to others working in your own field. Alternative careers are now the norm for those (like myself) with a PhD in biology. Depending on what you want to do, that’s not necessarily bad news, but it is an argument for taking the time to hone your communication skills. So, where can a graduate student or post-doc start?

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Topics: Career, Scientific Sharing, Networking

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