Latest Posts

All Posts

Celebrating Outstanding CRISPR/Cas9 Achievements at the Dr. Paul Janssen Award Dinner

Posted by Joanne Kamens on Sep 15, 2014 2:05:00 PM

Scientists are excited by somewhat unusual things. For example, I am not that interested in meeting movie stars, but when I met the astronaut Jim Lovell I was speechless (the club of people who have been in space is pretty small). Therefore, I was delighted to be invited to the ceremony for surely what is one of many awards that will be bestowed upon discovers of CRISPR/Cas9 genome engineering, Dr. Jennifer Doudna and Dr. Emmanuelle Charpentier. I was joined by Addgene Scientist Matt Ferenc (one of our resident CRISPR experts) at the 2014 Johnson & Johnson’s Dr. Paul Janssen Award dinner which took place at the New York Public library. Being in the presence of scientific heroines is always inspiring. I was especially excited to attend this event because Jennifer did her graduate work one floor above mine in the lab of Dr. Jack Szostak, who went on to win the Nobel Prize. Dr. Doudna has had a host of other impressive mentors including Tom Cech, Robert Tijian, Tom Steitz and Joan Steitz.

Read More >

Topics: Fun, CRISPR

CRISPR-Cas9 FAQs Answered!

Posted by Caroline LaManna on Mar 13, 2014 12:08:00 PM

As Kendall mentioned in Tuesday's blog post, keeping up with the newest CRISPR technologies and their applications can be exhausting. A quick search for "CRISPR", short-hand for Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, in Pubmed returned 728 articles (3/12/2014). With so many options for CRISPR plasmid tools and numerous experimental design decisions to make, it makes sense that scientists, many of whom are venturing into genome editing for the first time, have lots of questions.

Read More >

Topics: Plasmid Technology, Genome Engineering, Lab Tips, CRISPR

Keeping Up With CRISPR/Cas9

Posted by Kendall Morgan on Mar 11, 2014 1:55:37 PM

If any of you are finding it hard to keep up with the news on CRISPR, there's a pretty good reason for that. Lately, significant advances in the understanding and application of CRISPR/Cas9 technology are coming along at a fast and furious pace. In December, as we've blogged about before, there was the first direct demonstration that CRISPR's could be used to correct disease mutations, both in mice and in human cells. But that important advance was quickly followed by even splashier news: Jiahao Sha of Nanjing Medical University had successfully used the CRISPR/Cas9 system to precisely edit specific genes in monkeys.

"Our study shows that the CRISPR/Cas9 system enables simultaneous disruption of two target genes in one step without producing off-target mutations," Sha was quoted as saying when the news first broke. "Considering that many human diseases are caused by genetic abnormalities, targeted genetic modification in monkeys is invaluable for the generation of human disease models."

Read More >

Topics: Plasmid Technology, Genome Engineering, CRISPR

Lentiviral CRISPR Libraries Enable Genome-Scale, Knockout Screening

Posted by Kendall Morgan on Feb 20, 2014 11:57:00 AM

It’s clear that CRISPR-Cas9 technology has really changed the game for anyone looking to quickly and easily manipulate specific genes. But what if you want to study genes all across the genome? Two new human lentiviral CRISPR library systems described in companion papers in Science in December were developed as an answer to that question. Additionally, a concurrent Nature Biotechnology article describes the development of a mouse lentiviral CRISPR library. 

“This enables you to do customized genetic modification on a scale that was really not possible before,” said the Broad Institute's Ophir Shalem. “Whole regions of the genome which were not accessible before are now accessible using this technology.”

Read More >

Topics: Plasmid Technology, Genome Engineering, CRISPR, pooled libraries

Using CRISPR/Cas9 to Edit Disease Out of the Genome

Posted by Kendall Morgan on Jan 7, 2014 10:45:00 AM

There can be no doubt that CRISPR/Cas9 technology has been a breakthrough for the genome-editing field. Now two studies reported in Cell Stem Cell last month show that this tool - already so useful in the laboratory - might also find its way to the clinic.

A team led by Jinsong Li from the Chinese Academy of Sciences found that mice with a dominant mutation in a gene that causes cataracts could be rescued by coinjection into zygotes of Cas9 mRNA and a single-guide RNA targeting the mutant allele. An independent team led by Hans Clevers at Hubrecht Institute in The Netherlands used the CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing system to correct the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductor receptor (CFTR) by homologous recombination in cultured intestinal stem cells of patients with cystic fibrosis.

Read More >

Topics: Plasmid Technology, Genome Engineering, CRISPR

Blog Logo Vertical-01.png

Subscribe to Our Blog