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Mapping the 4D nucleome with CRISPR/Cas9

Posted by Mary Gearing on Aug 11, 2015 10:30:00 AM

It seems that there’s a new CRISPR advance or technique published every week! One of the newest applications is a colorful system that uses fluorescently labeled Cas9 to label multiple genomic loci in live cells. While other systems can be used to label loci, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) or fluorescently labeled TALEs, CRISPR/Cas9’s ease of use and ability to label live cells make this system truly advantageous. This new technique, developed in Thoru Pederson’s lab, brings us one step closer to mapping the 4D nucleome, the organization of the nucleus in space and time, and to understanding how nuclear organization varies across the life of a cell, or how organization may be altered in disease states.

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Topics: CRISPR, Imaging, Fluorescent Proteins

CRISPR 101: Validating Your Genome Edit

Posted by Melina Fan on Jul 30, 2015 10:30:00 AM

You’ve created your gRNA expression construct and used Cas9 to introduce it into your target cells. Hooray! You’re ready to begin reading out data, right? Almost. In this blog post we’ll explain how to verify that your cells were appropriately edited. We’ll also cover the basic techniques for detecting insertion, deletion, and mutation events.

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Topics: Genome Engineering, CRISPR, CRISPR 101

Protein Tagging with CRISPR/Cas9: A Conversation with Mendenhall and Myers

Posted by Kendall Morgan on Jul 28, 2015 10:30:00 AM

As Eric Mendenhall of the University of Alabama in Huntsville explains it, a major goal in his laboratory is to understand the function of the non-coding portion of the genome. Mendenhall and Richard Myers of HudsonAlpha (where Mendenhall is also an adjunct faculty member) have together been working toward this goal for years as members of the ENCyclopedia of DNA Elements Project (ENCODE), an NIH-funded effort to define all of the functional elements in the human genome.

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Topics: Interview, CRISPR

A Match Made in Heaven: CRISPR and AAV

Posted by Mary Gearing on Jul 14, 2015 10:30:00 AM

This post was updated on Dec 4, 2017.

CRISPR genome editing has quickly become the most popular system for in vitro and germline genome editing, but in vivo gene editing approaches have been limited by problems with Cas9 delivery. Adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV) are commonly used for in vivo gene delivery due to their low immunogenicity and range of serotypes allowing preferential infection of certain tissues. However, packaging Streptococcus pyogenes (SpCas9) and a chimeric sgRNA together (~4.2 kb) into an AAV vector is challenging due to the low packaging capacity of AAV (~4.5 kb.) While this approach has been proven feasible, it leaves little room for additional regulatory elements. Feng Zhang's group previously packaged Cas9 and multiple gRNAs into separate AAV vectors, increasing overall packaging capacity but necessitating purification and co-infection of two AAVs.

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Topics: CRISPR, Viral Vectors

Another Pathway into Cells: iTOP

Posted by Mary Gearing on Jun 23, 2015 4:37:00 PM

Primary cells recapitulate the natural biology of a cell type of interest better than immortalized lines derived from the same cell type; however, their usage has been limited by technical problems. For instance, it’s much more difficult to introduce a gene of interest into primary cells, so most primary cell lines require viral infection. A new paper from Niels Geijsen’s lab suggests that primary cells may be better transduced using only protein. Read on for a description of the lab’s iTOP protein-only transduction method and its potential applications to CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing.

 

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Topics: CRISPR, Techniques

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