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CRISPR Challenges: Standardization and Homology Directed Repair

Posted by Mary Gearing on Feb 14, 2018 9:36:24 AM

Blugene and I represented Addgene at the recent Keystone meeting on Precision Genome Editing with Programmable Nucleases. Check out #KSgenome on Twitter if you missed our live updates!

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Topics: CRISPR

Genome Engineering, CRISPR, and Research in Singapore: Interview with Wei Leong Chew

Posted by Tyler Ford on Feb 6, 2018 9:00:56 AM

In today’s podcast, we sit down with Wei Leong Chew, a researcher at the Genome Institute of Singapore who recently started his own lab. We discuss some of the joys and difficulties of getting a lab up and running, and learn a little bit about what it was like for Wei Leong to work in George Church’s lab as a graduate student.

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Topics: Genome Engineering, CRISPR, Podcast

New CRISPR Web Resources and #12DaysofCRISPR Recap

Posted by Mary Gearing on Dec 12, 2017 10:13:34 AM

Since the start of the CRISPR revolution, Addgene has distributed over 100,000 CRISPR plasmids. But that’s not our only job - we strive to also give you high-quality educational resources to help you do better research. CRISPR is an incredibly fast-moving field, and we want to make it easy for you to keep up with new developments (and, of course, find plasmids that will be useful to you.)

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Topics: CRISPR, CRISPR 101, Using Addgene's Website

Hot Plasmids Episode 4: B. subtilis Libraries, iPSC Reprogramming, CRISPR Tools, & More!

Posted by Tyler Ford on Dec 11, 2017 9:02:49 AM

In the fourth episode of our Hot Plasmids podcast series, you'll learn about new libraries for studying B. subtilis biology, plasmids for enhancing iPSC production, and CRISPR tools for plants. You can find additional hot plasmids in our quarterly newsletter or on our hot plasmids webpage.

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Topics: Hot Plasmids, Optogenetics, CRISPR, Podcast

CAPTURE-ing Chromatin Interactions: Using CRISPR-dCas9 to Study Gene Regulation

Posted by Beth Kenkel on Dec 7, 2017 9:16:43 AM

Plasmids can be amazing and simple tools for studying gene regulation. They are used to study how transcription factors and other trans-regulatory elements (TREs) and some cis-regulatory elements (CREs), like promoters, influence gene expression. However, scientists frequently return to native chromosomes because chromatin context matters. The impact of TREs and CREs on gene expression is commonly investigated via Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and chromatin capture techniques, respectively, but these two separate methods are not without their own technical challenges. Enter the Xu Lab's CAPTURE, a method for identifying TREs and CREs that partners CRISPR’s targeting abilities with the strength of the biotin-streptavidin interaction. CAPTURE is capable of identifying old and new TREs and CREs, CRE-CRE interactions, and has even provided enough data for Liu et al to re-draw the beta-globin locus regulation model. Read on to learn more about this captivating tool!

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Topics: CRISPR, Techniques

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