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Why Scientists Should Give Twitter a Try

Posted by Kendall Morgan on Feb 27, 2014 12:21:05 PM

If your PI or peers are like most of the researchers I know, they probably aren’t avid fans or active users of Twitter. But did you know a lot of scientists and others who care about science – science journalists and scientific organizations (including Addgene) - are on Twitter? It turns out Twitter can be a great way to expand your network well beyond the lab and engage in interesting conversations about science, or at least eavesdrop on them. As noted by an article prepared for Ideas in Ecology and Evolution,Twitter can provide access to a ‘virtual’ department of followers that almost always exceeds the size of traditional academic departments. (For more choice nuggets from this paper, take a closer look at the infographic that was created by Catherine Pratt on her website, katiephd.com.)

An engaging conversation in snippets of 140 characters or less, you might be asking yourself? Yes, exactly.

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Topics: Fun, Scientific Sharing

Plasmids 101: Yeast Vectors

Posted by Marcy Patrick on Feb 25, 2014 2:11:00 PM

In our first few Plasmids 101 posts, we focused mainly on the elements required for plasmid maintenence within an E. coli cell, but vectors can be widely utilized across many different cell types and each one requires different elements for vector propogation. This post, along with a future companion post on mammalian vectors, will catch you up on the core replication and resistance features of yeast vectors and explain how they differ from the bacterial elements previously described.

Why Do Scientists Use Yeast Vectors?

Yeast are eukaryotes and thus contain complex internal cell structures similar to those of plants and animals. Unlike bacteria, yeast can post-translationally modify proteins yet they still share many of the same technical advantages that come with working with prokaryotes. This includes but is not limited to: rapid growth, ease of replica plating and mutant isolation, a well-defined genetic system, and a highly versatile DNA transformation system.

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Topics: Plasmid How To, Plasmid Elements, Lab Tips, Plasmids 101

Lentiviral CRISPR Libraries Enable Genome-Scale, Knockout Screening

Posted by Kendall Morgan on Feb 20, 2014 11:57:00 AM

It’s clear that CRISPR-Cas9 technology has really changed the game for anyone looking to quickly and easily manipulate specific genes. But what if you want to study genes all across the genome? Two new human lentiviral CRISPR library systems described in companion papers in Science in December were developed as an answer to that question. Additionally, a concurrent Nature Biotechnology article describes the development of a mouse lentiviral CRISPR library. 

“This enables you to do customized genetic modification on a scale that was really not possible before,” said the Broad Institute's Ophir Shalem. “Whole regions of the genome which were not accessible before are now accessible using this technology.”

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Topics: Plasmid Technology, Genome Engineering, CRISPR, pooled libraries

Form Your Own Peer Mentoring Group: A How-To Guide for Scientists

Posted by Joanne Kamens on Feb 18, 2014 11:22:39 AM

This is the fourth post in the Addgene Blog Mentoring for Scientists Series.

I have been thinking a lot about Mentoring for over 10 years. Many successful scientists describe having a “posse” of mentors as one key to their success. But how do you find these elusive teachers, supporters and advisors? I tried to start a more formal mentoring program at my company, but there weren't enough senior people willing to step up and be matched with the many interested mentees. So I experimented with a group mentoring format where 1 mentor met with a group of mentees to get more “bang for the buck”.


Listen to our podcast interview with Harvard Medical School researcher Connie Cepko to learn about her mentoring style.

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Topics: Career, Mentoring for Scientists

Plasmids 101: How to Name Your Plasmid in 3 Easy Steps

Posted by Matthew Ferenc on Feb 13, 2014 8:00:00 AM

There are no universal rules for naming plasmids but here are some good guidelines to follow in order to ensure that people can quickly and easily identify what your plasmid contains and other important information.

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Topics: Plasmid How To, Lab Tips, Plasmids 101

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