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London Calling - Addgene’s New Europe Office in London

Posted by Benoit Giquel on Jun 10, 2014 11:20:00 AM

You’ve called. You’ve emailed. And Addgene has been there to answer your plasmid questions. But until now, you’ve always had to call the United States - Cambridge, MA to be exact. Today, that changes.

Today, Addgene launches a brand new Europe office located in London and operated in collaboration with LGC Standards. And now you’ll be able to call us - Benoit Giquel and Emma Markham - the newest Addgenies. Got a question at 9:00am GMT? We’ll be poised and ready to answer your questions about Addgene, plasmids, and depositing (all while our US counterparts are still sleeping).

Plasmid Sharing in Europe: Addgene’s Request Statistics

Since 2004, Addgene has shipped more than 75,000 plasmids to more than 1,500 different institutions in Europe. In the last four years alone, the number of plasmids distributed to Europe has doubled going from 9,500 in 2010 to more than 20,000 in 2013. And the number of plasmids requested by scientists based in Europe over the first five months of 2014 reaffirms this trend.

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Topics: Scientific Sharing, Inside Addgene

Story of a SynBio Startup: RevBio's Epiphany (or Lack Thereof)

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jun 5, 2014 11:32:00 AM

This post was contributed by Nikolai Braun and Keira Havens, co-founders of Revolution Bioengineering. 

Last year we started a company. Revolution Bioengineering is two responsible adults in their 30s who have quit their academic science careers in order to head to Ireland and take a chance as entrepreneurs. To make things more interesting, we are working in a new technical discipline that nobody understands (synthetic biology), building a product no one has ever seen before (flowers that change color throughout the day) and doing this with very little money. So when did inspiration strike us so hard that we upended our lives and took this daring risk? What moment changed our whole outlook on the possibilities in life for employment? 

It never happened – there was never a “moment”. But there were a lot of very small steps.

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Topics: Career, Synthetic Biology, Career Readiness

Developing Transferable Skills During Science Training

Posted by Joanne Kamens on Jun 3, 2014 10:14:00 AM

You are finishing your PhD or perhaps you have almost completed a postdoctoral position… or two. You have learned a lot. Whether you are pursuing an academic career path or moving in a nonacademic direction, there are many “transferable” skills you have developed in addition to learning how to be a scientist. Why not stack the deck in your favor? Look for opportunities to practice transferable skills in ways that will also enhance your science training and that will put you in position to pursue a diverse set of career paths.

Check out Joanne's Reddit AMA

Here are some concrete things you can do to develop those transferable skills while you are also learning to be an excellent scientist.

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Topics: Career, Career Readiness

Tips for Using BLAST to Verify Plasmids

Posted by Jason Niehaus on May 29, 2014 9:29:00 AM

This post was updated on Dec 4, 2017.

At Addgene, we continually use the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) provided by NCBI. BLAST helps us compare the sequencing results of the plasmids in our repository with known reference sequences, such as full plasmid sequences provided by the laboratories that deposit their plasmids with us or other entries in NCBI’s numerous databases.

As our repository has grown over the years (we now have over 60,000 plasmids!), the number of sequencing results we analyze as part of our quality control process has steadily grown. On a busy week, we may need to analyze more than 200 plasmids as part of our quality control process. Consequently our team has refined our use of the BLAST web browser interface to be as efficient as possible.

If you find yourself frequently on the BLAST website to verify plasmids or validating your new clones, try these tips to make the most of your time and sequence! You might also enjoy seeing how our quality control process has changed with the introduction of next generation sequencing! 

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Topics: Plasmid How To, Lab Tips

Dos & Don'ts When Publishing a Scientific Manuscript

Posted by Guest Blogger on May 22, 2014 12:02:55 PM

This post was contributed by Maaike Pols, PhD, a Developmental Editor at F1000Research. 

With many changes taking place in the world of science publishing, and an ever increasing number of journals and publishers to choose from, it gets very confusing for scientists writing research articles. What should you take into account when writing up your research?

What type of journal should I choose?

Writing a research paper for publication in a scientific journal requires several considerations. First, it is important to establish the type of audience you want to reach with your paper. Is it the wider scientific community, or are you writing for a specific subgroup of researchers in your area of expertise? Sometimes, the funders of your research may stipulate that your article must be published in an open access journal or by using the open access option in a conventional journal. Publishing via open access means that your manuscript will be available to anyone who wishes to read it, without them needing a subscription to the journal. An increasing number of funding bodies insist that the research data resulting from their funding should also be published. All these factors will influence your choice of journals to submit your work to.

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Topics: Career, Lab Tips

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