Latest Posts

All Posts

How Exercise Purges Stress and Keeps Depression at Bay

Posted by Kendall Morgan on Nov 25, 2014 11:02:00 AM

It’s well known that exercise can help fight stress and depression, and now researchers have reported a mechanism based on studies of transgenic mice that helps to explain how it works. The findings in a recent issue of Cell demonstrate how PGC-1a1, a transcriptional coactivator induced in skeletal muscle by exercise and endurance, protects the brain from depression.

Mice that are genetically modified to produce extra PGC-1a1 only in their skeletal muscle show resistance to stressful circumstances – including unpredictable loud noises and flashing lights - that sent average, control mice into depression. In case you were wondering, depression shows up in mice as poorer performance on forced swim tests and less interest in sweets.

Read More >

Topics: Hot Plasmids, News

We've Launched Addgene's New & Improved Website!

Posted by Caroline LaManna on Nov 19, 2014 10:10:53 AM

We have lift off! You may have noticed a new friendly face on our website this morning announcing the launch of our new website. We are excited to finally bring you our new and improved website. We’ve been working diligently over the past month to design a site that is easier to navigate and helps you more effectively find the plasmids (and plasmid cloning information) that you’re looking for. 

I’ve put together a few screenshots below to show you just some of our new features, but the best way for you to see what’s changed is to head over to the upgraded Addgene website and explore for yourself. Don’t worry – it’s the same URL you’ve been using for years, so I promise you won’t get lost!

Read More >

Topics: Inside Addgene, News

Fueled by Coffee at #SfN14

Posted by Caroline LaManna on Nov 18, 2014 2:15:14 PM

I have an important question: How much coffee does it take to fuel more than 30,000 neuroscientists over a 5 day conference? I feel like here at the annual Society for Neuroscience meeting in Washington, D.C., we must be making a dent in the global coffee supply… My back-of-the-napkin calculations put the daily consumption here at ~ 60,000 cups of coffee per day if everyone drinks 2 cups per day – which would mean ~ 300,000 cups of coffee would be consumed throughout the entire 5 day event. Though, to be fair, I think this is a conservative estimate. As a graduate student, I drank 3-4 cups of coffee a day, and I had colleagues who were much more wired. Here at #SfN14 there are thousands of posters being fueled by highly caffeinated grad students and postdocs, which accounts for many, many lattes and espressos.

Read More >

Topics: Fun, CRISPR

Introducing an All-in-One CRISPR/Cas9 Vector System for Multiplex Genome Engineering

Posted by Kendall Morgan on Nov 12, 2014 10:54:00 AM

A newly established all-in-one vector construction system for CRISPR/Cas9-mediated multiplex genome engineering is now available thanks to researchers at Japan’s Hiroshima University who described their new tool in Scientific Reports in June.

“The multiplexity is one of the most advantageous properties of CRISPR/Cas9 compared to ZFNs and TALENs,” said Tetsushi Sakuma of Hiroshima University. “However, there had been no systematically established way of making an all-in-one vector for multiplex genome engineering.”

Read More >

Topics: CRISPR, Plasmid Kits

Plasmids 101: Common Lab E. coli Strains

Posted by Matthew Ferenc on Nov 7, 2014 9:56:00 AM

This post was updated on Nov 14, 2017.

You've worked hard designing your plasmid – you carefully selected the optimal promoter for your gene of interest, painstakingly cloned into the perfect empty backbone, made sure to add the right tags to your gene, and may have even put a fluorescent protein downstream, separated by an IRES element. You did a lot of work! But let’s take a moment to recognize your little prokaryotic minions that carried out the labor-intensive process of replicating your new plasmid: the Escherichia coli bacteria.

It’s hard to count the number of different commercial strains of E. coli currently available  a quick Google search suggests there are hundreds. This only includes general lab strains designed for subcloning or protein expression. If you were to include customized strains, the number is probably in the thousands! The goal of this article is to provide enough background for you to distinguish the features of any common lab strain and determine whether it is appropriate for propogating your plasmid or carrying out your experiment.

Read More >

Topics: Lab Tips, Plasmids 101

Blog Logo Vertical-01.png

Subscribe to Our Blog