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Advice on Career Paths and the Green Card Process for International Researchers and Entrepreneurs

Posted by Guest Blogger on Dec 20, 2017 9:33:58 AM

This post was contributed by guest bloggers Lauren Celano of Propel Careers and Rachel Casseus, Esq. Founder of Casseus Law.

Disclaimer: The contents of this post are intended to convey general information only and not to provide legal advice or opinions. The contents of this post should not be relied upon for legal advice in any particular circumstance or fact situation.  The information presented may not reflect the most current legal developments.  Further, this post may contain technical inaccuracies or typographical errors.  No action should be taken in reliance on the information contained in this post and we disclaim all liability in respect to actions taken or not taken based on any or all the contents of this post.  An attorney should be contacted for advice on specific legal issues. 

The permanent residence “green card” process is a necessary and often overlooked part of career development for foreign national researchers and entrepreneurs who are looking to continue their careers in the United States. There has been a growing shift away from employers sponsoring individuals for green cards because of the cost, long timeline and uncertainty associated with filing a permanent residence case with United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS). If it were up to us, we would give everyone with a Ph.D. a green card, but until we get elected to Congress, we are tasked with working with US immigration in its current state. As of September 2017, USCIS received 116,224 employment based green card applications and approved 91,023 during the first 3 quarters of 2017. As an international researcher and aspiring entrepreneur, you have many career options available to you including careers in academia, industry, non-profit, and government sectors.  Within these sectors, you could start your own company, work in a bench research career or a non-bench research career such as law, medical/technical writing, clinical, regulatory, product development, business development, consulting, policy, big data and the list goes on and on.

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Topics: Career

The Strength of Story Telling

Posted by Guest Blogger on Dec 19, 2017 9:00:17 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger Jack Leeming Editor of Naturejobs, part of Nature magazine.

Humans are built to enjoy, remember, and listen to narratives — take advantage of that in your work

The part of my job I most enjoy is building and telling interesting stories — whether I’m working with a talented journalist to shine light on living as a scientist in Beijing, talking to people about taking beautiful photographs of their studies, reporting on amazing women in science, or asking someone how and why they left academia. Humans are designed to pay attention and enjoy anecdotal forms of information — identifying with a character, building emotional investment and following cause-and-effect relationships are all things almost all of us are programmed to appreciate and understand.

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Topics: Science Communication

A Novice's Perspective on Neuroscience - SfN2017

Posted by Tyler Ford on Dec 15, 2017 9:07:01 AM

Addgene recently attended the Society for Neuroscience 2017 conference in Washington DC (#SfN17). This massive conference attracted over 30,000 attendees (scientists and nonscientists alike). My only in-depth exposure to neuroscience prior to this conference was a rotation in Qiao Zhou’s lab in graduate school where I worked on a project aiming to dedifferentiate mouse brain cells into neural stem cells. I was quite unsuccesful (although I definitely enjoyed the lab!) and would therefore consider myself a neuroscience novice (newb). In this post, I’d like to highlight some of the things that popped out to me as a novice and indicate why other neuroscience newbies might want to get into the field.

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Topics: Viral Vectors

pCXLE toolkit: Efficient episomal plasmid-based method to reprogram peripheral blood cells to iPSCs

Posted by Guest Blogger on Dec 14, 2017 9:08:09 AM

This post was contributed by Kusumika (Kushi) Mukherjee, a Postdoc at Massachussetts General Hospital.

A little over a decade back when Yamanaka and colleagues reported that it is possible to reprogram differentiated cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by the addition of reprogramming (or “Yamanaka”) factors, they changed the landscape of regenerative medicine. Their work opened up vast possibilities for the clinical and therapeutic applications of iPSCs. The generation of human iPSCs (hiPSCs) now provides an opportunity to develop and use patient-specific somatic cells that are otherwise difficult to obtain. These can then be used to perform cell therapy and to model diseases in vitro.

Find stem cell plasmids at Addgene

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Topics: Plasmid Technology, Hot Plasmids, Stem Cells

ReFigure: Save Scientific Figures into Dashboards and Share Your Insights

Posted by Guest Blogger on Dec 13, 2017 10:20:23 AM

This post was contributed by guest blogger Girija Goyal, cofounder of ReFigure.

Reading and exploration including replications and experiments resulting in “negative data” often dominate the early years of a project. Dissemination of the knowledge gained during this period occurs infrequently and rarely makes it into the small selection of data found in full-length publications. As early career researchers, we wondered how we could make the insights gained during this time more visible and thereby have a positive impact on science.

ReFigure saves time, knowledge and makes your insights discoverable. Watch this quick video to learn how ReFigure works and continue reading for more details.

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Topics: Scientific Sharing

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