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CRISPR 101: Validating Your Genome Edit

Posted by Melina Fan on Jul 30, 2015 10:30:00 AM

You’ve created your gRNA expression construct and used Cas9 to introduce it into your target cells. Hooray! You’re ready to begin reading out data, right? Almost. In this blog post we’ll explain how to verify that your cells were appropriately edited. We’ll also cover the basic techniques for detecting insertion, deletion, and mutation events.

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Topics: Genome Engineering, CRISPR, CRISPR 101

Protein Tagging with CRISPR/Cas9: A Conversation with Mendenhall and Myers

Posted by Kendall Morgan on Jul 28, 2015 10:30:00 AM

As Eric Mendenhall of the University of Alabama in Huntsville explains it, a major goal in his laboratory is to understand the function of the non-coding portion of the genome. Mendenhall and Richard Myers of HudsonAlpha (where Mendenhall is also an adjunct faculty member) have together been working toward this goal for years as members of the ENCyclopedia of DNA Elements Project (ENCODE), an NIH-funded effort to define all of the functional elements in the human genome.

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Topics: Interview, CRISPR

Experimenting in an Open Source lab: from CRISPR to Cats

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jul 23, 2015 10:30:00 AM

The following post was contributed by Derek Jacoby from Makerspace Victoria, CA

Over the decades science has become increasingly restricted to academic and industrial labs, but recently there has been a counter movement by the public to access basic equipment and to become involved in developing tools and solutions to research problems. This movement calls itself the Open Science movement and is part of a bigger movement in a variety of research sectors to provide open source technologies and spaces where interested parties can do research. This interest manifested itself in the creation of Hackerspaces and Makerspaces back in 2007, which function as centres for peer learning and knowledge sharing, in the form of workshops, presentations, and lectures. There are currently around 1,000 active makerspaces around the world. Hackerspaces.org maintains a list of active spaces near you.

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Topics: Scientific Sharing

IDP and your PI: A Roadmap for Career Planning and Personal Development

Posted by Mary Gearing on Jul 21, 2015 10:30:00 AM

As we get closer to the start of another academic year, graduate students and post-docs alike are wondering where the time has gone. Are we any closer to graduating, publishing that key paper, or figuring out a career path? Many trainees are developing Individual Development Plans (IDP's) through Science Careers’ myIDP tool. Using myIDP, you can identify suitable careers based on your current interests and skillset. With this information in hand, you can then formulate a plan to further develop your transferable skills and reach your career goals.     

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Topics: Career, Lab Tips, Career Readiness

Light Sheet Fluorescence Microscopy

Posted by Guest Blogger on Jul 16, 2015 10:30:00 AM

This post was contributed by Jae Lee and Pantelis Tsoulfas of the Department of Neurological Surgery at the University of Miami.

The beginning of this century has seen some major advances in light microscopy, particularly related to the neurosciences.  These developments in microscopy coupled with techniques that make tissues transparent are enabling microscopes to visualize the cellular architecture of whole tissues in 3D with unprecedented detail.  One of these advances in microscopy has been light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM). The underlying method was developed in 1902 by Richard Zsigmondy and Henry Siedentopf to enhance the microscopic resolution for studying colloidal gold (1).  The method was based on using a thin plane (sheet) of light generated by sunlight to observe single gold particles with diameters less than 4nm.

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Topics: Imaging, Fluorescent Proteins

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