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Genome-wide Screening Using CRISPR

Posted by Joel McDade on Aug 18, 2015 10:30:00 AM

This post was updated on Dec 8, 2017.

What genes are important in your phenotype of interest? Many scientists study diseases for which the underlying genetic cause is not entirely known. Identifying which genes are important for a phenotype can lead to a wealth of additional experiments investigating the role of individual genes or entire pathways in a particular disease process. While CRISPR is certainly not the first means to carry out so-called “forward genetic screening experiments”, it is certainly the most robust. In this blog post, we will discuss how CRISPR libraries are being used to perform genome-wide screens and highlight some of the reagents that have been made publicly available through Addgene. 

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Topics: CRISPR, pooled libraries

Addgene Welcomes John Doench to the Advisory Board

Posted by Tyler Ford on Aug 13, 2015 10:30:00 AM

The Addgene Advisory Board consists of prominent members of the bioscience and tech transfer communities who help guide and promote Addgene in its mission to make research easier. Addgene is excited to announce that we’ve added John G. Doench, PhD to the Advisory Board. John Doench is Associate Director of the Genetic Perturbation Platform at the Broad Institute and has worked with many Addgenies to help improve the understanding, curation, and explanation of our CRISPR resources. We recently sat down with Dr. Doench for an interview to help further introduce him to the Addgene community.

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Topics: Interview, Inside Addgene, CRISPR, Podcast

Mapping the 4D nucleome with CRISPR/Cas9

Posted by Mary Gearing on Aug 11, 2015 10:30:00 AM

It seems that there’s a new CRISPR advance or technique published every week! One of the newest applications is a colorful system that uses fluorescently labeled Cas9 to label multiple genomic loci in live cells. While other systems can be used to label loci, such as fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) or fluorescently labeled TALEs, CRISPR/Cas9’s ease of use and ability to label live cells make this system truly advantageous. This new technique, developed in Thoru Pederson’s lab, brings us one step closer to mapping the 4D nucleome, the organization of the nucleus in space and time, and to understanding how nuclear organization varies across the life of a cell, or how organization may be altered in disease states.

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Topics: CRISPR, Imaging, Fluorescent Proteins

Gaining Leadership Skills Volunteering at a Professional Organization

Posted by Guest Blogger on Aug 6, 2015 10:30:00 AM

The follow post was contributed by guest blogger Juliet Moncaster

Leadership skills are amongst the professional abilities we often hear that scientists should acquire during their PhD and postdoctoral training. Addgene executive director Joanne Kamens has written a 5-part blog on the topic:  http://blog.addgene.org/management-for-scientists-managing-vs-leading.

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Topics: Career, Career Readiness

Seeing Red: Simple GFP Photoconversion

Posted by Mary Gearing on Aug 4, 2015 10:30:00 AM

Since the first research applications of GFP were published in the 1990s, biologists have spent a lot of time making things glow. Chances are you’ve used a GFP derivative to conduct subcellular localization studies or make a reporter construct. Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are also the foundation of multiple important technologies, including FRET and optogenetics. Even though GFP has been so thoroughly characterized, it turns out this protein has a few more secrets - during a collaboration, members of Maureen Hanson’s and Rima Menassa's labs made the accidental discovery that laser treatment can photoconvert GFP from green to RED! This simple technique has been shown to work in plant, Drosophila and mammalian cells, and it may find wide use in biological research.

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Topics: Fluorescent Proteins

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