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Anatomy of a Plasmid Page at Addgene

Posted by Jessica Welch on Feb 4, 2016 10:30:00 AM

Have you ever found yourself bamboozled by all of the different kinds of information on our plasmid pages? Well, to help make the most of these pages, we've written this post to guide you through them and make the best use of all the information provided by your colleagues.

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Topics: Plasmid Elements, Inside Addgene

Components of CRISPR/Cas9

Posted by Joel McDade on Feb 2, 2016 12:00:00 PM

At their most basic level, CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing systems use a non-specific endonuclease (Cas9 or closely related Cpf1) to cut the genome and a small RNA (gRNA) to guide this nuclease to a user-defined cut site. After reading this post, we hope you will be caught up on much of the major CRISPR lingo and will be able to describe the functions of the various CRISPR/Cas9 components. Please note that while this post is intended to provide a general overview of CRISPR components, new Cas9 variants are being discovered all the time and the requirements of these different systems can vary (for example, read our posts on Cpf1 and eSpCas9/SpCas9-HF1 for some of the interesting properties of these exciting new nuclease tools).

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Topics: CRISPR 101

CRISPR 101: Multiplex expression of gRNAs

Posted by Mary Gearing on Jan 28, 2016 10:50:00 AM

This post was updated on Dec 5, 2017.

CRISPR makes it easy to target multiple loci - a concept called multiplexing. Since CRISPR is such a robust system, editing or labeling efficiency doesn’t usually change when you add multiple gRNAs. Sound good? Addgene has many tools to help you multiplex - we’ll use mammalian plasmids to introduce you to some of your potential options and cloning methods, but please scroll down for plasmids suitable for other model systems, including E. coli, plants, Drosophila, and zebrafish!

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Topics: Genome Engineering, CRISPR, CRISPR 101, Plasmid Kits

Treating Muscular Dystrophy with CRISPR Gene Editing

Posted by Mary Gearing on Jan 26, 2016 10:30:00 AM

Having seen CRISPR’s success in basic research, researchers are eager to apply it in a clinical setting. CRISPR is often used for animal germline modification, to repair or add in disease-causing mutations, but, until recently it hadn’t been used to treat disease postnatally. Now, three papers published concurrently in Science have shown CRISPR can treat a genetic disease in a postnatal mouse model, an important proof of concept for future preclinical and clinical work.

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Topics: CRISPR

Michael Koeris' Journey from Grad Student to Entrepreneur: The Story of Sample 6

Posted by Tyler Ford on Jan 21, 2016 11:52:39 AM

In the third installment in our podcast series, we chat with new Addgene Board Member, Michael Koeris. Dr. Koeris did his graduate work in Professor Jim Collins' lab (then at Boston University, now at MIT) where he worked on understanding bacterial antibiotic resistance. During this time, Dr. Koeris and Professor Timothy Lu (a graduate student in the Collins' lab at the time) got the idea to engineer bacteriophage (viruses that infect bacteria) for use as antibiotics. To develop this idea, Drs. Koeris and Lu founded the biotech startup company, Novophage. As you'll hear Dr. Koeris explain however, the time was not right for the development of phage-based therapeutics. After a brief stint at the venture capital firm, Flagship Ventures, Koeris helped change Novophage's focus. The company went from developing therapeutics to developing phage-based tools for detecting pathogens in food products. Along the way, the company changed its name from Novophage to Sample 6.

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Topics: Career, Interview, Career Readiness, Podcast

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